DDoS bitFlyer

"Notice how anyone who has even remotely supported on-chain scaling has been censored, hounded, DDoS'd, attacked, slandered & removed from any area of Core influence. Community, business, Hearn, Gavin, Jeff, XT, Classic, Coinbase, Unlimited, ViaBTC, Ver, Jihan, Bitcoin.com, r/btc" ~ u/randy-lawnmole

Notice how anyone who has even remotely supported on chain scaling has been censored, hounded, DDOS'd, attacked, slandered and removed from any area of Core influence. Community, Business, Hearn, Gavin, Jeff, XT Classic Coinbase, Unlimited, ViaBtc, Ver, Jihan, Bitcoin.com, btc Blah blah blah.
At what point do the rational members of the Bitcoin world stand up together and say enough is enough?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5odsy3/for_the_last_two_weeks_ive_been_sending_at_least/dcinkdc/
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Core proponents now UDP DDos'ing XT nodes. This is what decentralized libertarian decision making looks like.

Bitcoin Core proponents now UDP DDos'ing XT nodes. This is what decentralized libertarian decision making looks like. submitted by ButtersBeButtin to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

The DDoS'ing of XT nodes was similar to "stochastic terrorism" - implicitly encouraged and/or insufficiently condemned by vocal supporters of Core / Blockstream and /r/Bitcoin

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/1/10/934890/-
Stochastic terrorism is the use of mass communications to stir up random lone wolves to carry out violent or terrorist acts that are statistically predictable but individually unpredictable.
The stochastic terrorist is the person who uses mass media to broadcast memes that incite unstable people to commit violent acts.
One or more unstable people responds to the incitement by becoming a lone wolf and committing a violent act. While their action may have been statistically predictable (e.g. "given the provocation, someone will probably do such-and-such"), the specific person and the specific act are not predictable (yet).
The stochastic terrorist then has plausible deniability: "Oh, it was just a lone nut, nobody could have predicted he would do that, and I'm not responsible for what people in my audience do."
The lone wolf who was the "missile" gets captured and sentenced to life in prison, while the stochastic terrorist keeps his prime time slot and goes on to incite more lone wolves.
submitted by UndergroundNews to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

Just turned my Intel NUC into a Bitcoin XT Full Node. Is DDoS a concern?

Network is 100 Mbps symmetrical but currently seeing about 40 Mbps incoming and 1Mbps outgoing. I expect things to quiet down once I catch up to the blockchain. Am I going to be under attack soon?
submitted by mickeybob to bitcoinxt [link] [comments]

I booted up a Bitcoin XT node after reading this post - You just don't DDoS rural areas to shreds in order to censor votes on bigger blocks.

I booted up a Bitcoin XT node after reading this post - You just don't DDoS rural areas to shreds in order to censor votes on bigger blocks. submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

"Notice how anyone who has even remotely supported on-chain scaling has been censored, hounded, DDoS'd, attacked, slandered & removed from any area of Core influence. Community, business, Hearn, Gavin, Jeff, XT, Classic, Coinbase, Unlimited, ViaBTC, Ver, Jihan, Bitcoin.com, r/btc" ~ u/randy-lawnmole

Notice how anyone who has even remotely supported on chain scaling has been censored, hounded, DDOS'd, attacked, slandered and removed from any area of Core influence. Community, Business, Hearn, Gavin, Jeff, XT Classic Coinbase, Unlimited, ViaBtc, Ver, Jihan, Bitcoin.com, btc Blah blah blah.
At what point do the rational members of the Bitcoin world stand up together and say enough is enough?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5odsy3/for_the_last_two_weeks_ive_been_sending_at_least/dcinkdc/
submitted by zcc0nonA to ShowerCoins [link] [comments]

DDoS attack mitigation against Bitcoin Classic , Bitcoin Unlimited and XT from BlockstreamCore.

Hi folks , I'm currently writing a scrypt which detects DDoS attacks against my bitcoin classic nodes. Once the DDoS is detected , it immediately shuts down the genuine classic client and starts up a bitcoin Core client that has 2MB block size enabled. So effectively the DDoS attack becomes benign. As soon as the DDoS attack stops, the bitcoin Core 2MB enabled client is shut down and genuine bitcoin Classic is restarted. Miners who want to use Bitcoin Classic and upgrade to larger blocks should also use this approach , running parallel nodes, as soon as they are DDoS they should run a 2MB enabled Core client on the same IP address and also start up another new Classic mining node on a new IP address. As soon as the DDoS is finished switch back to genuine classic. Hopefully once we are over the Temporary 1MB BlockStreamCore Fork things should resume back to normal operation with the bitcoin protocol scaling up as described by Satoshi in the bitcoin white paper.
submitted by madtek to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin XT Miners could use some instructions for DDoS protection

If XT gets 75% hash power there is a 2 week wait before mining bigger blocks. During those two weeks, an attacker wishing to disrupt the fork could try to DDoS 1/3 of XT nodes to make the hash power go from 75% to under 50%, which could possibly disrupt the fork.
It would be great if XT came with some instructions for miners to protect their nodes from DDoS to defend against this.
submitted by mickeybob to btc [link] [comments]

03-15 18:17 - '[quote] They have, do, and is incuraged. / Like yesterday, like the DDOS on XT. / This is how we all get stronger' by /u/AnonymousRev removed from /r/Bitcoin within 144-149min

'''
ways of how to attack and destroy BU or the BTU chain
They have, do, and is incuraged.
Like yesterday, like the DDOS on XT.
This is how we all get stronger
'''
Context Link
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: AnonymousRev
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

The DDoS'ing of XT nodes was similar to "stochastic terrorism" - implicitly encouraged and/or insufficiently condemned by vocal supporters of Core / Blockstream and /r/Bitcoin /r/bitcoin_uncensored

The DDoS'ing of XT nodes was similar to submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

In regard to the recent DDoS attacks against Classic nodes, Bitcoin XT had a "stealth mode" option. This could be implemented in Classic. /r/btc

In regard to the recent DDoS attacks against Classic nodes, Bitcoin XT had a submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Just turned my Intel NUC into a Bitcoin XT Full Node. Is DDoS a concern? /r/bitcoinxt

Just turned my Intel NUC into a Bitcoin XT Full Node. Is DDoS a concern? /bitcoinxt submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

DDoS attack mitigation against Bitcoin Classic , Bitcoin Unlimited and XT from BlockstreamCore. /r/btc

DDoS attack mitigation against Bitcoin Classic , Bitcoin Unlimited and XT from BlockstreamCore. /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Help to keep Bitcoin XT nodes up and protected from DDoS attacks /r/btc

Help to keep Bitcoin XT nodes up and protected from DDoS attacks /btc submitted by BitcoinAll to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

The DDoS'ing of XT nodes was similar to "stochastic terrorism" - implicitly encouraged and/or insufficiently condemned by vocal supporters of Core / Blockstream and /r/Bitcoin (/r/bitcoin_uncensored)

The DDoS'ing of XT nodes was similar to submitted by ContentForager to mistyfront [link] [comments]

Help to keep Bitcoin XT nodes up and protected from DDoS attacks /r/bitcoin_uncensored

Help to keep Bitcoin XT nodes up and protected from DDoS attacks /bitcoin_uncensored submitted by BitcoinAll to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin XT Miners could use some instructions for DDoS protection /r/btc

Bitcoin XT Miners could use some instructions for DDoS protection /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Help to keep Bitcoin XT nodes up and protected from DDoS attacks /r/bitcoinxt

Help to keep Bitcoin XT nodes up and protected from DDoS attacks /bitcoinxt submitted by BitcoinAll to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Help to keep Bitcoin XT nodes up and protected from DDoS attacks /r/BitcoinTechnology

Help to keep Bitcoin XT nodes up and protected from DDoS attacks /BitcoinTechnology submitted by BitcoinAll to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Since they're calling for r/btc to be banned...

Maybe it's time to discuss bitcoin's history again. Credit to u/singularity87 for the original post over 3 years ago.

People should get the full story of bitcoin because it is probably one of the strangest of all reddit subs.
bitcoin, the main sub for the bitcoin community is held and run by a person who goes by the pseudonym u/theymos. Theymos not only controls bitcoin, but also bitcoin.org and bitcointalk.com. These are top three communication channels for the bitcoin community, all controlled by just one person.
For most of bitcoin's history this did not create a problem (at least not an obvious one anyway) until around mid 2015. This happened to be around the time a new player appeared on the scene, a for-profit company called Blockstream. Blockstream was made up of/hired many (but not all) of the main bitcoin developers. (To be clear, Blockstream was founded before mid 2015 but did not become publicly active until then). A lot of people, including myself, tried to point out there we're some very serious potential conflicts of interest that could arise when one single company controls most of the main developers for the biggest decentralised and distributed cryptocurrency. There were a lot of unknowns but people seemed to give them the benefit of the doubt because they were apparently about to release some new software called "sidechains" that could offer some benefits to the network.
Not long after Blockstream came on the scene the issue of bitcoin's scalability once again came to forefront of the community. This issue came within the community a number of times since bitcoins inception. Bitcoin, as dictated in the code, cannot handle any more than around 3 transactions per second at the moment. To put that in perspective Paypal handles around 15 transactions per second on average and VISA handles something like 2000 transactions per second. The discussion in the community has been around how best to allow bitcoin to scale to allow a higher number of transactions in a given amount of time. I suggest that if anyone is interested in learning more about this problem from a technical angle, they go to btc and do a search. It's a complex issue but for many who have followed bitcoin for many years, the possible solutions seem relatively obvious. Essentially, currently the limit is put in place in just a few lines of code. This was not originally present when bitcoin was first released. It was in fact put in place afterwards as a measure to stop a bloating attack on the network. Because all bitcoin transactions have to be stored forever on the bitcoin network, someone could theoretically simply transmit a large number of transactions which would have to be stored by the entire network forever. When bitcoin was released, transactions were actually for free as the only people running the network were enthusiasts. In fact a single bitcoin did not even have any specific value so it would be impossible set a fee value. This meant that a malicious person could make the size of the bitcoin ledger grow very rapidly without much/any cost which would stop people from wanting to join the network due to the resource requirements needed to store it, which at the time would have been for very little gain.
Towards the end of the summer last year, this bitcoin scaling debate surfaced again as it was becoming clear that the transaction limit for bitcoin was semi regularly being reached and that it would not be long until it would be regularly hit and the network would become congested. This was a very serious issue for a currency. Bitcoin had made progress over the years to the point of retailers starting to offer it as a payment option. Bitcoin companies like, Microsoft, Paypal, Steam and many more had began to adopt it. If the transaction limit would be constantly maxed out, the network would become unreliable and slow for users. Users and businesses would not be able to make a reliable estimate when their transaction would be confirmed by the network.
Users, developers and businesses (which at the time was pretty much the only real bitcoin subreddit) started to discuss how we should solve the problem bitcoin. There was significant support from the users and businesses behind a simple solution put forward by the developer Gavin Andreesen. Gavin was the lead developer after Satoshi Nakamoto left bitcoin and he left it in his hands. Gavin initially proposed a very simple solution of increasing the limit which was to change the few lines of code to increase the maximum number of transactions that are allowed. For most of bitcoin's history the transaction limit had been set far far higher than the number of transactions that could potentially happen on the network. The concept of increasing the limit one time was based on the fact that history had proven that no issue had been cause by this in the past.
A certain group of bitcoin developers decided that increasing the limit by this amount was too much and that it was dangerous. They said that the increased use of resources that the network would use would create centralisation pressures which could destroy the network. The theory was that a miner of the network with more resources could publish many more transactions than a competing small miner could handle and therefore the network would tend towards few large miners rather than many small miners. The group of developers who supported this theory were all developers who worked for the company Blockstream. The argument from people in support of increasing the transaction capacity by this amount was that there are always inherent centralisation pressure with bitcoin mining. For example miners who can access the cheapest electricity will tend to succeed and that bigger miners will be able to find this cheaper electricity easier. Miners who have access to the most efficient computer chips will tend to succeed and that larger miners are more likely to be able to afford the development of them. The argument from Gavin and other who supported increasing the transaction capacity by this method are essentially there are economies of scale in mining and that these economies have far bigger centralisation pressures than increased resource cost for a larger number of transactions (up to the new limit proposed). For example, at the time the total size of the blockchain was around 50GB. Even for the cost of a 500GB SSD is only $150 and would last a number of years. This is in-comparison to the $100,000's in revenue per day a miner would be making.
Various developers put forth various other proposals, including Gavin Andresen who put forth a more conservative increase that would then continue to increase over time inline with technological improvements. Some of the employees of blockstream also put forth some proposals, but all were so conservative, it would take bitcoin many decades before it could reach a scale of VISA. Even though there was significant support from the community behind Gavin's simple proposal of increasing the limit it was becoming clear certain members of the bitcoin community who were part of Blockstream were starting to become increasingly vitriolic and divisive. Gavin then teamed up with one of the other main bitcoin developers Mike Hearn and released a coded (i.e. working) version of the bitcoin software that would only activate if it was supported by a significant majority of the network. What happened next was where things really started to get weird.
After this free and open source software was released, Theymos, the person who controls all the main communication channels for the bitcoin community implemented a new moderation policy that disallowed any discussion of this new software. Specifically, if people were to discuss this software, their comments would be deleted and ultimately they would be banned temporarily or permanently. This caused chaos within the community as there was very clear support for this software at the time and it seemed our best hope for finally solving the problem and moving on. Instead a censorship campaign was started. At first it 'all' they were doing was banning and removing discussions but after a while it turned into actively manipulating the discussion. For example, if a thread was created where there was positive sentiment for increasing the transaction capacity or being negative about the moderation policies or negative about the actions of certain bitcoin developers, the mods of bitcoin would selectively change the sorting order of threads to 'controversial' so that the most support opinions would be sorted to the bottom of the thread and the most vitriolic would be sorted to the top of the thread. This was initially very transparent as it was possible to see that the most downvoted comments were at the top and some of the most upvoted were at the bottom. So they then implemented hiding the voting scores next to the users name. This made impossible to work out the sentiment of the community and when combined with selectively setting the sorting order to controversial it was possible control what information users were seeing. Also, due to the very very large number of removed comments and users it was becoming obvious the scale of censorship going on. To hide this they implemented code in their CSS for the sub that completely hid comments that they had removed so that the censorship itself was hidden. Anyone in support of scaling bitcoin were removed from the main communication channels. Theymos even proudly announced that he didn't care if he had to remove 90% of the users. He also later acknowledged that he knew he had the ability to block support of this software using the control he had over the communication channels.
While this was all going on, Blockstream and it's employees started lobbying the community by paying for conferences about scaling bitcoin, but with the very very strange rule that no decisions could be made and no complete solutions could be proposed. These conferences were likely strategically (and successfully) created to stunt support for the scaling software Gavin and Mike had released by forcing the community to take a "lets wait and see what comes from the conferences" kind of approach. Since no final solutions were allowed at these conferences, they only served to hinder and splinter the communities efforts to find a solution. As the software Gavin and Mike released called BitcoinXT gained support it started to be attacked. Users of the software were attack by DDOS. Employees of Blockstream were recommending attacks against the software, such as faking support for it, to only then drop support at the last moment to put the network in disarray. Blockstream employees were also publicly talking about suing Gavin and Mike from various different angles simply for releasing this open source software that no one was forced to run. In the end Mike Hearn decided to leave due to the way many members of the bitcoin community had treated him. This was due to the massive disinformation campaign against him on bitcoin. One of the many tactics that are used against anyone who does not support Blockstream and the bitcoin developers who work for them is that you will be targeted in a smear campaign. This has happened to a number of individuals and companies who showed support for scaling bitcoin. Theymos has threatened companies that he will ban any discussion of them on the communication channels he controls (i.e. all the main ones) for simply running software that he disagrees with (i.e. any software that scales bitcoin).
As time passed, more and more proposals were offered, all against the backdrop of ever increasing censorship in the main bitcoin communication channels. It finally come down the smallest and most conservative solution. This solution was much smaller than even the employees of Blockstream had proposed months earlier. As usual there was enormous attacks from all sides and the most vocal opponents were the employees of Blockstream. These attacks still are ongoing today. As this software started to gain support, Blockstream organised more meetings, especially with the biggest bitcoin miners and made a pact with them. They promised that they would release code that would offer an on-chain scaling solution hardfork within about 4 months, but if the miners wanted this they would have to commit to running their software and only their software. The miners agreed and the ended up not running the most conservative proposal possible. This was in February last year. There is no hardfork proposal in sight from the people who agreed to this pact and bitcoin is still stuck with the exact same transaction limit it has had since the limit was put in place about 6 years ago. Gavin has also been publicly smeared by the developers at Blockstream and a plot was made against him to have him removed from the development team. Gavin has now been, for all intents an purposes, expelled from bitcoin development. This has meant that all control of bitcoin development is in the hands of the developers working at Blockstream.
There is a new proposal that offers a market based approach to scaling bitcoin. This essentially lets the market decide. Of course, as usual there has been attacks against it, and verbal attacks from the employees of Blockstream. This has the biggest chance of gaining wide support and solving the problem for good.
To give you an idea of Blockstream; It has hired most of the main and active bitcoin developers and is now synonymous with the "Core" bitcoin development team. They AFAIK no products at all. They have received around $75m in funding. Every single thing they do is supported by theymos. They have started implementing an entirely new economic system for bitcoin against the will of it's users and have blocked any and all attempts to scaling the network in line with the original vision.
Although this comment is ridiculously long, it really only covers the tip of the iceberg. You could write a book on the last two years of bitcoin. The things that have been going on have been mind blowing. One last thing that I think is worth talking about is the u/bashco's claim of vote manipulation.
The users that the video talks about have very very large numbers of downvotes mostly due to them having a very very high chance of being astroturfers. Around about the same time last year when Blockstream came active on the scene every single bitcoin troll disappeared, and I mean literally every single one. In the years before that there were a large number of active anti-bitcoin trolls. They even have an active sub buttcoin. Up until last year you could go down to the bottom of pretty much any thread in bitcoin and see many of the usual trolls who were heavily downvoted for saying something along the lines of "bitcoin is shit", "You guys and your tulips" etc. But suddenly last year they all disappeared. Instead a new type of bitcoin user appeared. Someone who said they were fully in support of bitcoin but they just so happened to support every single thing Blockstream and its employees said and did. They had the exact same tone as the trolls who had disappeared. Their way to talking to people was aggressive, they'd call people names, they had a relatively poor understanding of how bitcoin fundamentally worked. They were extremely argumentative. These users are the majority of the list of that video. When the 10's of thousands of users were censored and expelled from bitcoin they ended up congregating in btc. The strange thing was that the users listed in that video also moved over to btc and spend all day everyday posting troll-like comments and misinformation. Naturally they get heavily downvoted by the real users in btc. They spend their time constantly causing as much drama as possible. At every opportunity they scream about "censorship" in btc while they are happy about the censorship in bitcoin. These people are astroturfers. What someone somewhere worked out, is that all you have to do to take down a community is say that you are on their side. It is an astoundingly effective form of psychological attack.
submitted by CuriousTitmouse to btc [link] [comments]

What mechanism does Blockstream & co use to disrupt competing developer groups?

As most here know, Blockstream & co have a stranglehold on the Core development team which manages the node software known as 'Core' currently in use by a majority of the Bitcoin network. I can easily imagine the combination of threats or payoffs that it would take to accomplish that feat, but what I can't so easily understand is through what mechanism they prevent the rise of competing development groups.
It seems pretty clear to me that the solution for resolving the hostile developer takeover of Core is to simply decide as a network to stop using Core software. Forking away from rouge developers was always the mechanism for maintaining decentralized control of the chain, but some people took that to mean forking away from the entire chain, which is asinine.
Currently a very small group of corruptable humans have complete control over a single github repo and node implementation called Core. The Bitcoin network itself is made up of millions of individuals from all around the world who currently choose to mine with software released by the Core group, but we could just as easily choose to run software released by another group.
We've seen some pretty solid attempts at node diversification in the past - first with XT, then Classic, then Unlimited. Each of those node implementations made a significant dent in the node ratio on the Bitcoin network, but each eventually fell out of favor. Then, with the addition of replay protection on the ABC node software, BCH forked away from the main network and with it all of the competing node software. I can't help but think that this was an intentional ploy by the same powers behind Blockstream to divert any competing developer groups away from the main chain, so that Blockstream and Core could maintain control over the Bitcoin network unopposed.
So that leaves us with the question, what prevents the rise of successful developer groups on the Bitcoin network? I know that competing node implementations have been DDOS attacked in the past, but is that it? Is that the whole strategy? Could that single mechanism be responsible for the uncontested control Core currently enjoys over the Bitcoin node ratio, or is there something else? Why did XT, Classic, and Unlimited all fail to gain majority use on the network, and how can we ensure that the next attempt is successful where past attempts have failed.
I know that many will respond here with the opinion that BCH has solved this problem, but really that just denies the issue. If Core could be so easily compromised, then so could ABC or Unlimited. Even if the whole world were to move to BCH without a solution to this underlying problem the entire takeover will simply be repeated. We need to set the precedent of forking away from a rouge node implementation and we need to do it on the main chain. This is the only real solution.
submitted by shazvaz to btc [link] [comments]

For the newcomers

I haven't seen this posted in a while. If you've never read this post, you really should.
Edit: Screwed up the formatting. See other comments.

People should get the full story of bitcoin because it is probably one of the strangest of all reddit subs.
bitcoin, the main sub for the bitcoin community is held and run by a person who goes by the pseudonym u/theymos. Theymos not only controls bitcoin, but also bitcoin.org and bitcointalk.com. These are top three communication channels for the bitcoin community, all controlled by just one person.
For most of bitcoin's history this did not create a problem (at least not an obvious one anyway) until around mid 2015. This happened to be around the time a new player appeared on the scene, a for-profit company called Blockstream. Blockstream was made up of/hired many (but not all) of the main bitcoin developers. (To be clear, Blockstream was founded before mid 2015 but did not become publicly active until then). A lot of people, including myself, tried to point out there we're some very serious potential conflicts of interest that could arise when one single company controls most of the main developers for the biggest decentralised and distributed cryptocurrency. There were a lot of unknowns but people seemed to give them the benefit of the doubt because they were apparently about to release some new software called "sidechains" that could offer some benefits to the network.
Not long after Blockstream came on the scene the issue of bitcoin's scalability once again came to forefront of the community. This issue came within the community a number of times since bitcoins inception. Bitcoin, as dictated in the code, cannot handle any more than around 3 transactions per second at the moment. To put that in perspective Paypal handles around 15 transactions per second on average and VISA handles something like 2000 transactions per second. The discussion in the community has been around how best to allow bitcoin to scale to allow a higher number of transactions in a given amount of time. I suggest that if anyone is interested in learning more about this problem from a technical angle, they go to btc and do a search. It's a complex issue but for many who have followed bitcoin for many years, the possible solutions seem relatively obvious. Essentially, currently the limit is put in place in just a few lines of code. This was not originally present when bitcoin was first released. It was in fact put in place afterwards as a measure to stop a bloating attack on the network. Because all bitcoin transactions have to be stored forever on the bitcoin network, someone could theoretically simply transmit a large number of transactions which would have to be stored by the entire network forever. When bitcoin was released, transactions were actually for free as the only people running the network were enthusiasts. In fact a single bitcoin did not even have any specific value so it would be impossible set a fee value. This meant that a malicious person could make the size of the bitcoin ledger grow very rapidly without much/any cost which would stop people from wanting to join the network due to the resource requirements needed to store it, which at the time would have been for very little gain.
Towards the end of the summer last year, this bitcoin scaling debate surfaced again as it was becoming clear that the transaction limit for bitcoin was semi regularly being reached and that it would not be long until it would be regularly hit and the network would become congested. This was a very serious issue for a currency. Bitcoin had made progress over the years to the point of retailers starting to offer it as a payment option. Bitcoin companies like, Microsoft, Paypal, Steam and many more had began to adopt it. If the transaction limit would be constantly maxed out, the network would become unreliable and slow for users. Users and businesses would not be able to make a reliable estimate when their transaction would be confirmed by the network.
Users, developers and businesses (which at the time was pretty much the only real bitcoin subreddit) started to discuss how we should solve the problem bitcoin. There was significant support from the users and businesses behind a simple solution put forward by the developer Gavin Andreesen. Gavin was the lead developer after Satoshi Nakamoto left bitcoin and he left it in his hands. Gavin initially proposed a very simple solution of increasing the limit which was to change the few lines of code to increase the maximum number of transactions that are allowed. For most of bitcoin's history the transaction limit had been set far far higher than the number of transactions that could potentially happen on the network. The concept of increasing the limit one time was based on the fact that history had proven that no issue had been cause by this in the past.
A certain group of bitcoin developers decided that increasing the limit by this amount was too much and that it was dangerous. They said that the increased use of resources that the network would use would create centralisation pressures which could destroy the network. The theory was that a miner of the network with more resources could publish many more transactions than a competing small miner could handle and therefore the network would tend towards few large miners rather than many small miners. The group of developers who supported this theory were all developers who worked for the company Blockstream. The argument from people in support of increasing the transaction capacity by this amount was that there are always inherent centralisation pressure with bitcoin mining. For example miners who can access the cheapest electricity will tend to succeed and that bigger miners will be able to find this cheaper electricity easier. Miners who have access to the most efficient computer chips will tend to succeed and that larger miners are more likely to be able to afford the development of them. The argument from Gavin and other who supported increasing the transaction capacity by this method are essentially there are economies of scale in mining and that these economies have far bigger centralisation pressures than increased resource cost for a larger number of transactions (up to the new limit proposed). For example, at the time the total size of the blockchain was around 50GB. Even for the cost of a 500GB SSD is only $150 and would last a number of years. This is in-comparison to the $100,000's in revenue per day a miner would be making.
Various developers put forth various other proposals, including Gavin Andresen who put forth a more conservative increase that would then continue to increase over time inline with technological improvements. Some of the employees of blockstream also put forth some proposals, but all were so conservative, it would take bitcoin many decades before it could reach a scale of VISA. Even though there was significant support from the community behind Gavin's simple proposal of increasing the limit it was becoming clear certain members of the bitcoin community who were part of Blockstream were starting to become increasingly vitriolic and divisive. Gavin then teamed up with one of the other main bitcoin developers Mike Hearn and released a coded (i.e. working) version of the bitcoin software that would only activate if it was supported by a significant majority of the network. What happened next was where things really started to get weird.
After this free and open source software was released, Theymos, the person who controls all the main communication channels for the bitcoin community implemented a new moderation policy that disallowed any discussion of this new software. Specifically, if people were to discuss this software, their comments would be deleted and ultimately they would be banned temporarily or permanently. This caused chaos within the community as there was very clear support for this software at the time and it seemed our best hope for finally solving the problem and moving on. Instead a censorship campaign was started. At first it 'all' they were doing was banning and removing discussions but after a while it turned into actively manipulating the discussion. For example, if a thread was created where there was positive sentiment for increasing the transaction capacity or being negative about the moderation policies or negative about the actions of certain bitcoin developers, the mods of bitcoin would selectively change the sorting order of threads to 'controversial' so that the most support opinions would be sorted to the bottom of the thread and the most vitriolic would be sorted to the top of the thread. This was initially very transparent as it was possible to see that the most downvoted comments were at the top and some of the most upvoted were at the bottom. So they then implemented hiding the voting scores next to the users name. This made impossible to work out the sentiment of the community and when combined with selectively setting the sorting order to controversial it was possible control what information users were seeing. Also, due to the very very large number of removed comments and users it was becoming obvious the scale of censorship going on. To hide this they implemented code in their CSS for the sub that completely hid comments that they had removed so that the censorship itself was hidden. Anyone in support of scaling bitcoin were removed from the main communication channels. Theymos even proudly announced that he didn't care if he had to remove 90% of the users. He also later acknowledged that he knew he had the ability to block support of this software using the control he had over the communication channels.
While this was all going on, Blockstream and it's employees started lobbying the community by paying for conferences about scaling bitcoin, but with the very very strange rule that no decisions could be made and no complete solutions could be proposed. These conferences were likely strategically (and successfully) created to stunt support for the scaling software Gavin and Mike had released by forcing the community to take a "lets wait and see what comes from the conferences" kind of approach. Since no final solutions were allowed at these conferences, they only served to hinder and splinter the communities efforts to find a solution. As the software Gavin and Mike released called BitcoinXT gained support it started to be attacked. Users of the software were attack by DDOS. Employees of Blockstream were recommending attacks against the software, such as faking support for it, to only then drop support at the last moment to put the network in disarray. Blockstream employees were also publicly talking about suing Gavin and Mike from various different angles simply for releasing this open source software that no one was forced to run. In the end Mike Hearn decided to leave due to the way many members of the bitcoin community had treated him. This was due to the massive disinformation campaign against him on bitcoin. One of the many tactics that are used against anyone who does not support Blockstream and the bitcoin developers who work for them is that you will be targeted in a smear campaign. This has happened to a number of individuals and companies who showed support for scaling bitcoin. Theymos has threatened companies that he will ban any discussion of them on the communication channels he controls (i.e. all the main ones) for simply running software that he disagrees with (i.e. any software that scales bitcoin).
As time passed, more and more proposals were offered, all against the backdrop of ever increasing censorship in the main bitcoin communication channels. It finally come down the smallest and most conservative solution. This solution was much smaller than even the employees of Blockstream had proposed months earlier. As usual there was enormous attacks from all sides and the most vocal opponents were the employees of Blockstream. These attacks still are ongoing today. As this software started to gain support, Blockstream organised more meetings, especially with the biggest bitcoin miners and made a pact with them. They promised that they would release code that would offer an on-chain scaling solution hardfork within about 4 months, but if the miners wanted this they would have to commit to running their software and only their software. The miners agreed and the ended up not running the most conservative proposal possible. This was in February last year. There is no hardfork proposal in sight from the people who agreed to this pact and bitcoin is still stuck with the exact same transaction limit it has had since the limit was put in place about 6 years ago. Gavin has also been publicly smeared by the developers at Blockstream and a plot was made against him to have him removed from the development team. Gavin has now been, for all intents an purposes, expelled from bitcoin development. This has meant that all control of bitcoin development is in the hands of the developers working at Blockstream.
There is a new proposal that offers a market based approach to scaling bitcoin. This essentially lets the market decide. Of course, as usual there has been attacks against it, and verbal attacks from the employees of Blockstream. This has the biggest chance of gaining wide support and solving the problem for good.
To give you an idea of Blockstream; It has hired most of the main and active bitcoin developers and is now synonymous with the "Core" bitcoin development team. They AFAIK no products at all. They have received around $75m in funding. Every single thing they do is supported by theymos. They have started implementing an entirely new economic system for bitcoin against the will of it's users and have blocked any and all attempts to scaling the network in line with the original vision.
Although this comment is ridiculously long, it really only covers the tip of the iceberg. You could write a book on the last two years of bitcoin. The things that have been going on have been mind blowing. One last thing that I think is worth talking about is the u/bashco's claim of vote manipulation.
The users that the video talks about have very very large numbers of downvotes mostly due to them having a very very high chance of being astroturfers. Around about the same time last year when Blockstream came active on the scene every single bitcoin troll disappeared, and I mean literally every single one. In the years before that there were a large number of active anti-bitcoin trolls. They even have an active sub buttcoin. Up until last year you could go down to the bottom of pretty much any thread in bitcoin and see many of the usual trolls who were heavily downvoted for saying something along the lines of "bitcoin is shit", "You guys and your tulips" etc. But suddenly last year they all disappeared. Instead a new type of bitcoin user appeared. Someone who said they were fully in support of bitcoin but they just so happened to support every single thing Blockstream and its employees said and did. They had the exact same tone as the trolls who had disappeared. Their way to talking to people was aggressive, they'd call people names, they had a relatively poor understanding of how bitcoin fundamentally worked. They were extremely argumentative. These users are the majority of the list of that video. When the 10's of thousands of users were censored and expelled from bitcoin they ended up congregating in btc. The strange thing was that the users listed in that video also moved over to btc and spend all day everyday posting troll-like comments and misinformation. Naturally they get heavily downvoted by the real users in btc. They spend their time constantly causing as much drama as possible. At every opportunity they scream about "censorship" in btc while they are happy about the censorship in bitcoin. These people are astroturfers. What someone somewhere worked out, is that all you have to do to take down a community is say that you are on their side. It is an astoundingly effective form of psychological attack.
submitted by CuriousTitmouse to btc [link] [comments]

BitConnect promoters cover their a sses as site struggles with server downtime I bought a 30yr old ITALIAN YACHT and im going to Fix it ... Ankara Anlaşması başvurusu öncesi ve sonrası için öneriler ... $900 YouTube

UDP flood DDoS attacks against XT nodes. It would seem that the conflict has taken a nasty turn, and some of the more extreme Core supporters have started just straight out DDoS attacking XT nodes. Not the silly bloom filter CPU exhaustion thing, but actual UDP flood attacks. Looking at a recent drop-off at XTNodes.com, it seems that this has started during the last 24 hours, and one of my ... Bitcoin XT Gets Its Turn. The heated, at times ugly issue of Bitcoin’s block size may have stooped even lower. MIT Technology Review reports that several supporters of Bitcoin XT were DDoS’ed. Satoshilabs, which operates Slush Pool, was reportedly hit. It received a message that the attack would only end once it turns off its support for Bitcoin XT. Support for the implementation is ... Bitcoin XT nodes being DDOSed? We run chunkhost.com and a couple of days ago received a DDOS attack against one of our customers (as we sometimes do). Upon investigation, the customer explained he had been using the server as a bitcoin node for the backend for a bitcoin ATM for over a year with no… DDoS. DDoS is an abbreviation of "Distributed Denial of Service" and is a type of attack that occurs regularly on the internet. In this type of attack, a large number of computers distributed over multiple networks send connection requests to a specific computer or network, overwhelming the computer's capacity to communicate and suspending its service. Bitcoin XT vs Core, Blocksize limit, the schism that divides us all. Posted on August 19, 2015 by DJC @digitsu. Forking Bitcoin, the first existential milestone. The news recently is all abuzz about the Gavin Andresen and Mike Hearn’s fork of Bitcoin called Bitcoin XT. For the first time in the history of Bitcoin, its very existence has been put into peril by way of what is termed a ‘Hard ...

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BitConnect promoters cover their a sses as site struggles with server downtime

Herkese merhaba. Bu videomuzda Ankara Anlaşması'na başvuru yapacak ya da yapmış olanlar için bazı önerilerde bulundum. Videoda bahsettiğim size faydası olaca... You guys enjoyed the last one quite a bit so I figured I would make a second one. This particular ad caught my eye repeated times and when I finally took a l... In today's episode we bought a Riva Tropicana, a 44 foot 30 year old Italian Yacht, and were going to fix it up, repair it, restore it, and upgrade it! Enjoy... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. BitConnect promoters cover their a.sses as site struggles with server downtime. One of the things that made BitConnect so resilient to criticism was its wide network of promoters, shamelessly ...

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