What You Need To Know About Getting A Bitcoin Proxy

Windows 7 got the ban from our security officer, but she said nothing about MacOS 7.

Windows 7 got the ban from our security officer, but she said nothing about MacOS 7. submitted by kenfagerdotcom to VintageApple [link] [comments]

Where can you actually SPEND dogecoins? [Please Add on]

When trying to explain dogecoin to people for the first time, the #1 question I get is "Yeah but, can you actually use it to buy things?"
One of the major things that will take Dogecoin to the moon will be people actually using the Ð. For a currency to gain legitimacy, it's got to be spendable. The good news is, there are sites popping up that take the Ð! Some sites also list other sites that take the Ð and serve as directories. Considering how great this community is and how quickly we are growing, the number of transactions and using Ð as real money could really make the difference!

~ ~ ~ Dogecoin Stuff ~ ~ ~

CoinOK - Various Dogecoin Articles cocomfy - Various Dogecoin Articles DogeWow - Dogecoin Shirts KawaiiCrypto - Dogecoin/Crypto Stickers Shibe Mint - Physical Dogecoins

~ ~ ~ Clothing ~ ~ ~

BedlamThreadz - Shirts, Caps and Accessories BitDials - Luxury Watches, Jewelry, Bags etc. ClockworkCrypto - Crypto Clothes and merch CrownLifestyle - Beach Articles, Bikinis, Swimsuits, Towels etc. CryptoBantam - Crypto Clothes Cryptoish - Crypto Shirts CryptoShopper - Crypto Clothes and merch CryptoVerge - Bitcoin Shirts CypherMarket - Crypto Shirts, Bags and Mugs Eat Me Clothing - Huge Clothing Sortiment Encrypted Apparel - Crypto Clothes Frank & Beans - Underwear HippTee - Crypto Shirts KALEIDOO - Vintage Clothing Kryptoez - Socks Krypto Threadz - Crypto Clothes MyCoconutHeart - Women Clothes MyCryptoGear - Crypto Clothes ParkAndFinch - Glasses Print-Ted - Crypto merchandise collection and Design your own shirt Sakama - Leather Jackets & handknotted rugs The DOTA scene - DOTA Merchandise WhaleApparel - Crypto Clothes

~ ~ ~ Donating ~ ~ ~

Animal Neotropical - D5ivRQwT4TU8CEjNBhorpMKSe8bVkMYURQ archive.org - via changelly DogecoinSocksForTheHomeless - 9vnaTWu71XWimFCW3hctSxryQgYg7rRZ7y Doge4FAH - DUCKvJPNT16USvJmWWEwchZpRVHZwm4zRW Immunity Project - DMx7wPZ5ppZDEDWr1XSrpMdMRbGH7LXs97 Kamikaze Comics - DC8Tuid8X3Qwnpo5cvBum19w2LRWXfepqr Onwadan Foundation - via coinpayments.net Tor Project - DGvn1HLeMaCZEZZYUeBWBhUCJiS2hjzbGd

~ ~ ~ Food ~ ~ ~

35North - Extra Virgin Olive Oil Blockchain Coffee - Coffee DrApis - Raw Portuguese Bee Honey HODL Fuel - Coffee and Merch PexPeppers - Hot Sauces SaffronStore - Saffron

~ ~ ~ Gaming ~ ~ ~

8BitDo - French Retro Products Allgamer - Game Servers CJS CD Keys - Steam/Origin/Uplay Games/Keys Gamesonly.at - Steam/Origin/Uplay Games/Keys Keys4Coins - Steam/Origin/Uplay Games/Keys MMOGA - Steam/Origin/Uplay Games/Keys SimRai - Game Servers

~ ~ ~ Gift Cards ~ ~ ~

Bidali - Various Gift Cards Bitrefill - 750+ Gift Cards CoinCards - Huge Selection of Gift Cards GiftOff - Gift Cards

~ ~ ~ Smoking ~ ~ ~

101Vape - Vape Products Frontier Vapor - Vape Accessories RX Vape - Vape Products Vape Crypto - Vape Products VapePENstore - Vape Products Vaposhop - Vape Products Vapour Depot - Vape Products

~ ~ ~ Tech Stores ~ ~ ~

ArgoMall - Philippine Online Tech Store, Smartphones, TVs, Laptops, etc. DS Tec - Spanish Online Tech Store Ecosystems - Huge selection of Tech Articles FastTech - Wide Variety of Tech Articles

~ ~ ~ Traveling ~ ~ ~

Bitcoin.travel - Flight and Hotel Booking Greitai - Lithuanian Travel Site with Flight and Hotel Booking MoreStamps - Flight and Hotel Booking Travala - Hotel Booking Trippki - Hotel Booking

~ ~ ~ VPN/Proxy ~ ~ ~

AzireVPN - VPN BlackVPN - VPN CactusVPN - VPN DeepWebVPN - VPN HideMy.name - VPN PureVPN - VPN SaferVPN - VPN Surfshark - VPN TorGuard - VPN

~ ~ ~ Web Hosting ~ ~ ~

97cents - Web Hosting AbacoHosting - Web Hosting CoinHost - Web Hosting CryptoCloudHosting - Web Hosting Flokinet - Web Hosting HosterBox - Web Hosting Host Havoc - Web Hosting & Game Servers Hosting.co.uk - Web Hosting Hostinger - Web Hosting Hostsailor - Web Hosting Hostwinds - Web Hosting Motov - Web Hosting Privex - Private Cloud Hosting Snel - VPS THCservers - Web Hosting QHoster - Web Hosting

~ ~ ~ Misc ~ ~ ~

247bits - Crypto Cold Storage Cards AlmightyBoost - All Natural Male Testosterone Booster BitCars - Luxury Cars and Oldtimers BitStickers - Cryptocurrency Stickers BitStore - General Store with option to pay literally everything you want online with Dogecoin BlockchainAdventures - "Toshi to the moon" book and merch BP Fragrance - Dutch perfumes shop Bullion79 - Gold Coins, Gold Bars, etc. CleanItSupply - Cleaning Supplies Coinvibe - Crypto Merch CryptoArt - Crypto Art CryptoContactLenses - Contact Lenses CryptoLife - Crypto Merch CryptoMined - Crypto Mining Equipment Crypto Posters - Crypto Posters, shirts, hats, phone cases CryptoUniverse - Crypto Mining Equipment GPS Tracking Made Easy - Easy & Simple GPS Tracker Kits Jobgate - Job Market payed with Dogecoins Lue's House of International Decor - Decor Articles Lynx Art Collection - Art MobiSun - Solar Panels, Power Banks, Solar Generators Molecule Store - Various Articles about molecules Olympian Bitcoin - Crypto Merch Peername - Blockchain-Based Domain Names Pi-Supply - Raspberry Pi and accessories ShopOfThings - Electronic Tech Parts SugarTrends - Huge local stores online marketplace ThaiBaM - Coffee, Tea, Oils, Balms etc. TormentBox - Various prank articles like glitter letters etc. WikiLeaks Shop - Official Shirts, Mugs, Stickers, Posters, etc.
Disclaimer:

All links are provided with the best of my knowledge.Please make sure to check the shops listed here yourself again, before spending your Dogecoins there.In no way should the admin of this website be responsible for any fraudulently activities from any listed shop.

Thanks to Dimi for the links
DimiFWDonate: D62WT9ebWbVW8QtBE57TE8CUaH3s95T3dN
📷
submitted by SoiledCold5 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

"You chose the wrong hacker, fool"

You chose the wrong hacker, fool
I have a warehouse of 50 computational servers that at any moment, I can instantly activate. They will send so many ddos attacks to your internet, that you will be unable to use the internet at all. They run on a continuous circuit, and my main use for them is to mine bitcoin. The network effects of my ddos attacks are strong enough that if I leave them running for long enough, I can permanently disable someone's internet.. If it's a high profile target, like the government or a popular corporation, I can shut it down completely and keep it from working. It would be incredibly easy to sabotage those servers with malware. They run in the background, and can't be stopped. During my ten year career in electronic warfare, I've shut down over 100 hundred websites, and kept them completely shut down. It's fairly accurate and much more convenient than your average DDoS attacks. I could also issue arbitrary updates to web servers, turn flash players on and off, lock and unlock servers and so on. In addition, my power has granted me the ability to render entire computer networks completely offline. I have sent tens of thousands of ddos attacks for three weeks using my IRC and Web Chat clients (CrackMyDNS, Argus, ZNC, etc), I've zapped multiple ISPs in two countries, and I was responsible for multiple data leaks. I've kept a spreadsheet of IP addresses and Domain Names that have been compromised by me. I have the means to completely empty out a region of a major ISP. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to see that I'm the emperor of the Internet.
So, I finished doxxed you, how do you feel about that? Your email, and other info i listed is sent to an elite dark web hacker group, known as CssHackers. They will process my data, and will massively ddos you along with my own computational ddos station right here in alaska. Tough luck bud. Our combined ddos attacks will be enough to make your router explode; you really have no way to wiggle out of this. Maybe next time, you shouldn't have picked a fight with someone way out of your league, bud. I know your IP address from our previous engagement also. I don't care if you have the courts lined up, I have 2, 4 layer proxies that are stacked up each other, location spoofer, ddos protection, information spoofer, temp emails, basically every security measure out there. It would take millions of yours for you to even crack my name, bud. Maybe you should rethink your life choices, asshole, and maybe I'll add you to the whitelist. CssHackers are simply an elite. A big name, they have worked with intelligence agencies to unlock mails and computer systems. They are absolute master hackers. We will send your information to CssHackers and they will unlock your mails and computer systems and turn them into a boatload of malware that will leak its way into your bank account and other sources of private info. Well, you know what. After I'm done with all the damage to your finances and status, I can have you arrested and thrown in prison.
This was done by my sophisticated ai robotic network, adt, (automatic doxing tool), in less than a minute. You may call me a script kiddie, but this program is a state of the art doxxer, fbi and cia agents have even personally ASKED ME for this program. Also, this tool is 100% independent and undetectable from servers and some clients, so no security loopholes are created.
submitted by 9inchmutatedcock to copypasta [link] [comments]

A few stories about Brian Krebs: The independent cybercrime journalist who exposes criminals on the internet

First, a bit of introduction before we get into the living drama that is Brian Krebs.
Brian Krebs has been a journalist for decades, starting in the late 90s. He got his start at The Washington Post, but what he's most famous for are his exposes on criminal businesses and individuals who perpetuate cyber crime worldwide. In 2001, he got his interest in cybercrime piqued when a computer worm locked him out of his own computer. In 2005, he shifted from working as a staff writer at The Washington Post's tech newswire to writing for their security blog, "Security Wire". During his tenure there, he started by focusing on the victims of cybercrime, but later also started to focus on the perpetrators of it as well. His reporting helped lead to the shutdown of McColo, a hosting provider who provided service to some of the world's biggest spammers and hackers. Reports analyzing the shutdown of McColo estimated that global spam volume dropped by between 40 and 70 percent. Further analysis revealed it also played host to child pornography sites, and the Russian Business Network, a major Russian cybercrime ring.
In 2009, Krebs left to start his own site, KrebsOnSecurity. Since then, he's been credited with being the first to report on major events such as Stuxnet and when Target was breached, resulting in the leakage of 40 million cards. He also regularly investigates and reveals criminals' identities on his site. The latter has made him the bane of the world of cybercrime, as well as basically a meme, where criminals will include references like Made by Brian Krebs in their code, or name their shops full of stolen credit cards after him.
One of his first posts on his new site was a selection of his best work. While not particularly dramatic, they serve as an excellent example of dogged investigative work, and his series reveal the trail of takedowns his work has documented, or even contributed to.
And now, a selection of drama involving Krebs. Note, all posts are sarcastically-tinged retellings of the source material which I will link throughout. I also didn't use the real names in my retellings, but they are in the source material. This took way too long to write, and it still does massively condense the events described in the series. Krebs has been involved with feuds with other figures, but I'd argue these tales are the "main" bits of drama that are most suited for here.

Fly on the Wall

By 2013, Krebs was no stranger to cybercriminals taking the fight to the real world. He was swatted previously to the point where the police actually know to give him a ring and see if there'd actually been a murder, or if it was just those wacky hackers at it again. In addition, his identity was basically common knowledge to cybercriminals, who would open lines of credit in his name, or find ways to send him money using stolen credit cards.
However, one particular campaign against him caught his eye. A hacker known as "Fly" aka "Flycracker" aka "MUXACC1" posted on a Russian-language fraud forum he administered about a "Krebs fund". His plan was simple. Raise Bitcoin to buy Heroin off of a darknet marketplace, address it to Krebs, and alert his local police via a spoofed phone call. Now, because Krebs is an investigative journalist, he develops undercover presences on cybercrime forums, and it just so happened he'd built up a presence on this one already.
Guys, it became known recently that Brian Krebs is a heroin addict and he desperately needs the smack, so we have started the "Helping Brian Fund", and shortly we will create a bitcoin wallet called "Drugs for Krebs" which we will use to buy him the purest heroin on the Silk Road. My friends, his withdrawal is very bad, let’s join forces to help the guy! We will save Brian from the acute heroin withdrawal and the world will get slightly better!
Fly had first caught Krebs' attention by taunting him on Twitter, sending him Tweets including insults and abuse, and totally-legit looking links. Probably either laced with malware, or designed to get Krebs' IP. He also took to posting personal details such as Krebs' credit report, directions to his house, and pictures of his front door on LiveJournal, of all places.
So, after spotting the scheme, he alerted his local police that he'd probably have someone sending him some China White. Sure enough, the ne'er-do-wells managed to raise 2 BTC, which at the time was a cool $200 or so. They created an account on the premiere darknet site at the time, The Silk Road under the foolproof name "briankrebs7". They found one seller who had consistently high reviews, but the deal fell through for unknown reasons. My personal theory is the seller decided to Google where it was going, and realized sending a gram of dope into the waiting arms of local law enforcement probably wasn't the best use of his time. Still, the forum members persevered, and found another seller who was running a buy 10 get 2 free promotion. $165 of Bitcoin later, the drugs were on their way to a new home. The seller apparently informed Fly that the shipment should arrive by Tuesday, a fact which he gleefully shared with the forum.
While our intrepid hero had no doubt that the forum members were determined to help him grab the tail of the dragon, he's not one to assume without confirmation, and enlisted the help of a graduate student at UCSD who was researching Bitcoin and anonymity on The Silk Road, and confirmed the address shared by Fly was used to deposit 2 BTC into an account known to be used for money management on the site.
By Monday, an envelope from Chicago had arrived, containing a copy of Chicago confidential. Taped inside were tiny baggies filled with the purported heroin. Either dedicated to satisfied customers, or mathematically challenged, the seller had included thirteen baggies instead of the twelve advertised. A police officer arrived to take a report and whisked the baggies away.
Now, Fly was upset that Krebs wasn't in handcuffs for drug possession, and decided to follow up his stunt by sending Krebs a floral arrangement shaped like a cross, and an accompanying threatening message addressed to his wife, the dire tone slightly undercut by the fact that it was signed "Velvet Crabs". Krebs' curiosity was already piqued from the shenanigans with the heroin, but with the arrival of the flowers decided to dive deeper into the сука behind things.
He began digging into databases from carding sites that had been hacked, but got his first major breakthrough to his identity from a Russian computer forensics firm. Fly had maintained an account on a now-defunct hacking forum, whose database was breached under "Flycracker". It turns out, the email Flycracker had used was also hacked at some point, and a source told Krebs that the email was full of reports from a keylogger Fly had installed on his wife's computer. Now, because presumably his wife wasn't part of, or perhaps even privy to her husband's illicit dealings, her email account happened to be her full legal name, which Krebs was able to trace to her husband. Now, around this time, the site Fly maintained disappeared from the web, and administrators on another major fraud forum started purging his account. This is a step they typically take when they suspect a member has been apprehended by authorities. Nobody knew for sure, but they didn't want to take any chances.
More research by Krebs revealed that the criminals' intuition had been correct, and Fly was arrested in Italy, carrying documents under an assumed name. He was sitting in an Italian jail, awaiting potential extradition to the United States, as well as potentially facing charges in Italy. This was relayed to Krebs by a law enforcement official who simply said "The Fly has been swatted". (Presumably while slowly removing a pair of aviator sunglasses)
While Fly may have been put away, the story between Krebs and Fly wasn't quite over. He did end up being extradited to the US for prosecution, but while imprisoned in Italy, Fly actually started sending Krebs letters. Understandably distrustful after the whole "heroin" thing, his contacts in federal law enforcement tested the letter, and found it to be clean. Inside, there was a heartfelt and personal letter, apologizing for fucking with Krebs in so many ways. He also forgave Krebs for posting his identity online, leading him to muse that perhaps Fly was working through a twelve-step program. In December, he received another letter, this time a simple postcard with a cheerful message wishing him a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Krebs concluded his post thusly:
Cybercrooks have done some pretty crazy stuff to me in response to my reporting about them. But I don’t normally get this kind of closure. I look forward to meeting with Fly in person one day soon now that he will be just a short train ride away. And he may be here for some time: If convicted on all charges, Fly faces up to 30 years in U.S. federal prison.
Fly ultimately was extradited. He plead guilty and was sentenced to 41 months in jail

vDOS and Mirai Break The Internet

Criminals are none too happy when they find their businesses and identities on the front page of KrebsOnSecurity. It usually means law enforcement isn't far behind. One such business was known as vDOS. A DDOS-for-hire (also known as a "booter" or a "stresser") site that found itself hacked, with all their customer records still in their databases leaked. Analysis of the records found that in a four-month time span, the service had been responsible for about 8.81 years worth of attack time, meaning on average at any given second, there were 26 simultaneous attacks running. Interestingly, the hack of vDOS came about from another DDOS-for-hire site, who as it turns out was simply reselling services provided by vDOS. They were far from the only one. vDOS appeared to provide firepower to a large number of different resellers.
In addition to the attack logs, support messages were also among the data stolen. This contained some complaints from various clients who complained they were unable to launch attacks against Israeli IPs. This is a common tactic by hackers to try and avoid unwanted attention from authorities in their country of residence. This was confirmed when two men from Israel were arrested for their involvement in owning and running vDOS. However, this was just the beginning for this bit of drama.
The two men arrested went by the handles "applej4ck" and "Raziel". They had recently published a paper on DDOS attack methods in an online Israeli security magazine. Interestingly, on the same day the men were arrested, questioned, and released on bail, vDOS went offline. Not because it had been taken down by Israeli authorities, not because they had shut it down themselves, but because a DDOS protection firm, BackConnect Security, had hijacked the IP addresses belonging to the company. To spare a lot of technical detail, it's called a BGP hijack, and it basically works by a company saying "Yeah, those are our addresses." It's kind of amazing how much of the internet is basically just secured by the digital equivalent of pinky swears. You can read some more technical detail on Wikipedia. Anyway, we'll get back to BackConnect.
Following the publication of the story uncovering the inner workings of vDOS, KrebsOnSecurity was hit with a record breaking DDOS attack, that peaked at 620/Gbps, nearly double the most powerful DDOS attack previously on record. To put that in perspective, that's enough bandwidth to download 5 simultaneous copies of Interstellar in 4K resolution every single second, and still have room to spare. The attack was so devastating, Akamai, one of the largest providers of DDOS protection in the world had to drop Krebs as a pro bono client. Luckily, Google was willing to step in and place his site under the protection of Google's Project Shield, a free service designed to protect the news sites and journalists from being knocked offline by DDOS attacks.
This attack was apparently in retaliation for the vDOS story, since some of the data sent in the attack included the string "freeapplej4ck". The attack was executed by a botnet of Internet of Things (or IoT) devices. These are those "smart" devices like camera systems, routers, DVRs. Basically things that connect to the cloud. An astounding amount of those are secured with default passwords that can be easily looked up from various sites or even the manufacturers' websites. This was the start of a discovery of a massive botnet that had been growing for years.
Now time for a couple quick side stories:
Dyn, a company who provides DNS to many major companies including Twitter, Reddit, and others came under attack, leaving many sites (including Twitter and Reddit) faltering in the wake of it. Potentially due to one of their engineers' collaboration with Krebs on another story. It turned out that the same botnet that attacked Krebs' site was at least part of the attack on Dyn
And back to BackConnect, that DDOS protection firm that hijacked the IP addresses from vDOS. Well it turns out BGP Hijacks are old hat for the company. They had done it at least 17 times before. Including at least once (purportedly with permission) for the address 1.3.3.7. Aka, "leet". It turns out one of the co-founders of BackConnect actually posted screenshots of him visiting sites that tell you your public IP address in a DDOS mitigation industry chat, showing it as 1.3.3.7. They also used a BGP Hijack against a hosting company and tried to frame a rival DDOS mitigation provider.
Finally, another provider, Datawagon was interestingly implicated in hosting DDOS-for-hire sites while offering DDOS protection. In a Skype conversation where the founder of Datawagon wanted to talk about that time he registered dominos.pizza and got sued for it, he brings up scanning the internet for vulnerable routers completely unprompted. Following the publication of the story about BackConnect, in which he was included in, he was incensed about his portrayal, and argued with Krebs over Skype before Krebs ultimately ended up blocking him. He was subsequently flooded with fake contact requests from bogus or hacked Skype accounts. Shortly thereafter, the record-breaking DDOS attack rained down upon his site.
Back to the main tale!
So, it turns out the botnet of IoT devices was puppeteered by a malware called Mirai. How did it get its name? Well, that's the name its creator gave it, after an anime called Mirai Nikki. How did this name come to light? The creator posted the source code online. (The name part, not the origin. The origin didn't come 'til later.) The post purported that they'd picked it up from somewhere in their travels as a DDOS industry professional. It turns out this is a semi-common tactic when miscreants fear that law enforcement might come looking for them, and having the only copy of the source code of a malware in existence is a pretty strong indicator that you have something to do with it. So, releasing the source to the world gives a veneer of plausible deniability should that eventuality come to pass. So who was this mysterious benefactor of malware source? They went by the name "Anna-senpai".
As research on the Mirai botnet grew, and more malware authors incorporated parts of Mirai's source code into their own attacks, attention on the botnet increased, and on the people behind it. The attention was presumably the reason why Hackforums, the forum where the source code was posted, later disallowed ostensible "Server Stress Tester" services from being sold on it. By December, "Operation Tarpit" had wrought 34 arrests and over a hundred "knock and talk" interviews questioning people about their involvement.
By January, things started to come crashing down. Krebs published an extensive exposé on Anna-senpai detailing all the evidence linking them to the creation of Mirai. The post was so big, he included a damn glossary. What sparked the largest botnet the internet had ever seen? Minecraft. Minecraft servers are big business. A popular one can earn tens of thousands of dollars per month from people buying powers, building space, or other things. It's also a fiercely competitive business, with hundreds of servers vying for players. It turns out that things may have started, as with another set of companies, two rival DDOS mitigation providers competing for customers. ProTraf was a provider of such mitigation technology, and a company whose owner later worked for ProTraf had on at least one occasion hijacked addresses belonging to another company, ProxyPipe. ProxyPipe had also been hit with DDOS attacks they suspected to be launched by ProTraf.
While looking into the President of ProTraf, Krebs realized he'd seen the relatively uncommon combination of programming languages and skills posted by the President somewhere else. They were shared by Anna-senpai on Hackforums. As Krebs dug deeper and deeper into Anna-senpai's online presence, he uncovered other usernames, including one he traced to some Minecraft forums where a photoshopped picture of a still from Pulp Fiction contained the faces of BackConnect, which was a rival to ProTraf's DDOS mitigation business, and another face. A hacker by the name of Vyp0r, who another employee of ProTraf claimed betrayed his trust and blackmailed him into posting the source of another piece of malware called Bashlite. There was also a third character photoshopped into the image. An anime character named "Yamada" from a movie called B Gata H Hei.
Interestingly, under the same username, Krebs found a "MyAnimeList" profile which, out of 9 titles it had marked as watched, were B Gata H Hei, as well as Mirai Nikki, the show from which Mirai derived its name. It continues on with other evidence, including DDOS attacks against Rutgers University, but in short, there was little doubt in the identity of "Anna-senpai", but the person behind the identity did contact Krebs to comment. He denied any involvement in Mirai or DDOS attacks.
"I don’t think there are enough facts to definitively point the finger at me," [Anna-senpai] said. "Besides this article, I was pretty much a nobody. No history of doing this kind of stuff, nothing that points to any kind of sociopathic behavior. Which is what the author is, a sociopath."
He did, however, correct Krebs on the name of B Gata H Kei.
Epilogue
Needless to say, the Mirai botnet crew was caught, but managed to avoid jailtime thanks to their cooperation with the government. That's not to say they went unpunished. Anna-senpai was sentenced to 6 months confinement, 2500 hours of community service, and they may have to pay up to $8.6 million in restitution for their attacks on Rutgers university.

Other Stories

I don't have the time or energy to write another effortpost, and as is I'm over 20,000 characters, so here's a few other tidbits of Krebs' clashes with miscreants.
submitted by HereComesMyDingDong to internetdrama [link] [comments]

A slightly overboard response to my threat model.

For what I hope are obvious reasons, I don't want, and probably will never post my threat model publicly online. However, regardless of that, what I'm sure you will extrapolate from this post is that I live my life, digitally in particular, with a fairly high level threat model. This is not because I'm some super sophisticated criminal mastermind, but rather, I am at this level because I genuinely love playing around with this stuff. And I just happen to understand the importance of privacy and just how vital it is to a truly healthy society. I would like to extend a thanks to ProgressiveArchitect for the sharing of the knowledge they have done on this subreddit, /privacytoolsio, and the like. We may have never interacted, but nevertheless, your input into this community is truly interesting and extremely informative and educating. I'm sure those of you familiar with PA's setup will be able to draw some parallels with mine and their's.
Thank you.
I hope you all enjoy reading this write up.
I run Qubes OS on a Lenovo ThinkPad X230 laptop. Specs for it are as following: - i7-3520M - 16GB RAM - 1TB Samsung 860 Evo SSD - Qualcomm Atheros AR9285 wireless card
Additionally, I used a Raspberry Pi Model 3B+ and a Pomono SPI clip to replace the stock BIOS firmware with coreboot+me_cleaner. This wasn't done out of any "real" concern for the Intel ME (though of course proprietary black-boxes like it should be avoided at all costs and not trusted), but rather for open source enthusiasm and for increased security and faster boot times than what the stock BIOS firmware allows for. On that note about the ME, I don't believe the conspiracy theories that claim that it is a state-sponsored attack method for surveillance. I believe that Intel had good intentions for improving the lives of IT professionals who need to manage hundreds, if not thousands of remote machines. However, it has proven time and time again to be insecure, and I don't need the remote management and the "features" that it provides on my machines.
In Qubes, I use a combination of AppVMs and StandaloneVMs for a variety of different purposes. All VMs use PVH over HVM, except for the Mirage Unikernel Firewall, which uses PV, and the sys-net and sys-usb StandaloneVMs which have to use HVM because of PCI device passthrough. Right now most of my VMs are AppVMs, but for maintenance and compartmentalization reasons, I am considering moving more towards StandaloneVMs, despite the increase in disk space and bandwidth usage for updates.
General route of from Qubes to the Internet for anonymous browsing, general private browsing, accessing Uni services, and Uni-related anonymous browsing respectively: 1. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->sys-vpn-wg->sys-corridor->sys-whonix->whonix-ws-15-dvm to the internet. 2. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->sys-vpn-wg to the Internet. 3. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->uni-vpn-wg to the Internet. 4. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->uni-vpn-wg->uni-corridor->uni-whonix->uni-anon-research to the Internet.

(Note: the VPN name is substituted in the "vpn" above. I had to remove it to comply with this subreddit's rules. It is easy to identify what VPN it is as it randomly generates a long numaric string and has fantastic support for WireGuard.)

Web Browsers: - Tor Browser (primary) in a disposable Whonix VM. - Firefox (secondary) with the about:config changes listed on privacytools.io and the following extensions: Cookies AutoDelete, Decentraleyes, HTTPS Everywhere, uBlock Origin (advance user, all third party content blocked and JavaScript disabled), and Vim Vixen. Used in my personal AppVM. - Ungoogled Chromium (Uni only) with standard uBlock Origin and cVim. Used only for Uni-related access in my uni-campus and uni-home AppVMs.
Search Engine: SearX, Startpage, and DuckDuckGo.
Password Manager: KeePassXC.
Office: LibreOffice.
Notes: Standard Notes.
Messaging: Signal Desktop.
Media Playback: mpv.
Emails: I access my personal email within my personal Qubes domain and my Uni email using my Uni Qubes domains. My emails are downloaded to a local repository using isync, send using msmtp, and read using neomutt with html emails converted to plain text using w3m. Emails are sent in plain text too. All of the attachments in the emails (PDFs mostly) are automatically opened in DisposableVMs.
My personal Posteo email account has incoming encryption setup. This means that I emailed my public GPG key to an address correlated to my actual Posteo email address so that all email that I receive is encrypted with my public key and can only be decrypted using my private key. So even if my emails were intercepted and/or my account broken into, the contents of them are safe since they are encrypted as soon as they hit Posteo's servers.
I have setup a number of Posteo aliases that are completely segregated from the email I used to register my account. One of those is considered my "professional" email for my current job. I have another couple aliases, one dedicated for 33mail and another dedicated for Abine Blur. I make use of 33mail alias addresses for catch-all email addresses for registering for accounts that need to be under a username associated with my name anyways. This is for purposes like putting different compartmentalized, but still related emails to put onto my Resume. I use a different alias for each Resume I put out online. That way, when that information gets sold, traded, etc., I can easily trace it back to who sold the information. For example, if I applied for a job online that required me to go through the process of registering an account through a third-party, say 'xyz Inc', the address I would register that account with would be [email protected], or something along those lines. Abine Blur is used much in the same manner but for accounts that don't need to be associated with my real name in any way, say online shopping on Amazon that I do under an many aliases, then ship to various address that I don't live at, but that I can visit with no problems. I use a different Blur address with each service like with 33mail for the same reasoning shown above.
The passwords for the accounts are encrypted and stored locally in each of the domains, however, my private key is stored in my vault domain, so even if an adversary were to compromise the domains, they wouldn't be able to steal my private key without exploiting the hypervisor. They would only be able to wait for me to authorize the usage of my private key in that domain, and even then, it could only be used to decrypt files. That is a concern that they can use my private key to decrypt messages, but they wouldn't be able to steal the key. With my personal email, the emails would also be encrypted locally anyway so they wouldn't be able to read them. My Uni email, in contrast, uses Outlook unfortunately, so there isn't any option to enable incoming encryption, and even if it was, I'm not sure how private it would be anyways.
For those looking for an in depth list of all my VMs, with explanations for the more obscure ones, I have listed them below. I have got a lot of templates, hence why I am considering moving over to StandaloneVMs, but as of right now:

Templates:

StandaloneVMs:

AppVMs:

Phone: Motorola Moto G5s running Lineage OS 16.0 Pie no G-Apps or micro-G with the following Apps: - AdAway: Open Source hosts file-based ad blocker. (Requires root.) - AFWall+: Linux iptables front end. (Requires root.) - Amaze: File manager. - andOPT: 2FA app. I like it since it can export the entries to an AES encrypted file. - AntennaPod: Podcast manager. - AnySoftKeyboard - Simple Calendar - Simple Contacts Pro - DAVx5: CalDav syncronization with my calendar on my Posteo email account. - F-Droid - Fennec F-Droid: Web Browser. Has the same Firefox addons like on Qubes minus Vim Vixen. I used the app Privacy Settings to configure the about:config. - KeePassDX: Password manager. - KISS launcher - Magisk Manager - NewPipe: YouTube app replacement. - S.Notes: Standard Notes. - OsmAnd~: Maps and navigation. - Red Moon: Blue light filter. - SELinuxModeChanger: Exactly as it sounds. (Requires root.) - Shelter: Work profile manager. - Signal: Messaging. - Vinyl Music Player: Music player. - WireGuard: VPN protocol frontend. Is configured to use my VPN account. Is setup as an always-on and connected VPN.
As mentioned, I use Shelter to manage my work profile. In it I isolate the following apps: - Clover: *chan browser. - Orbot: For routing apps through Tor. Is setup as an always-on and connected VPN. - RedReader: Reddit client. - Tor Browser
Over the last several years, I have started using my phone less and less and taking advantage of less of what it has got to offer. I don't check email on my device. I have no real need to browse the Internet on it outside of watching videos using NewPipe, browsing Reddit, and various *chan boards.
On the Smart Phone side of things, I am considering purchasing an older used iPhone SE or 6S for use with MySudo when outside of my home as well as an iPod Touch for use on WiFi only for use inside my home. The iPhone would be kept inside of a faraday bag when I am at home and not using it. It would also be kept in the faraday bag whenever at home to avoid associating that device with my home address. The iPod Touch would be used for MySudo calls instead.
Future outlook and plan for my privacy and security:
To avoid as much deanonymisation of my privacy as possible, I'm only going to specify enough so that anyone reading this can get the jist of my situation in life. I am quite young (age 16 to 25) and I started along this privacy journey when I was even younger. I was never a very heavy social media user, however I did have an online presence if you looked hard enough. My name fortunately is a very common and short name, so that does help to bury information that I was not able to remove further in the vast trenches that is the Internet.
On the digital side of things, I mentioned that I have a dedicated Crypto AppVM for handling crypto currency transactions using Bisq. I have setup a dedicated bank account that I have periodically been transferring money into so that I can trade crypto. Unfortunately, I do not live in the US, so being able to effectively start trades with others is more difficult. I also do not have access to a credit card masking account like privacy.com (that I absolutely would use given the ability). I plan on getting an anonymous VPS to host my own Tor exit node for better speeds and to mitigate the possibility of malicious exit nodes. The country I live in has been a proponent of absolute dragnet surveillance on all activities occurring online and in real life, though the former is far more visible on this subreddit. I will be using crypto with cleaned Bitcoin (as seen with ProgressiveArchitect's setup) for purchasing my VPN service, etc.
With future hardware, to replace my aging laptop, I am very hopeful for Xen, then eventually Qubes OS getting ported to Power9. When that happens I'll be getting a Raptor Computing Blackbird as a desktop. Maybe in the future I'll get a Purism Librem laptop, but for now my corebooted X230 works perfectly for my use cases. On that note, I have successfully build the Heads firmware for the X230 and I was able to get the minimal 4MB image flashed on my laptop. I did revert it back to my coreboot setup after playing around a little with it, and unfortunately I haven't had time since to do a full, complete flash of it.
On the physical/real life side of things, I plan on making use of various Trusts in order to hold assets, say to keep my name from being immediately visible on the title of my car. As of right now I am fortunate enough to have the title of my car under the name of someone who I trust. Unless I am legally required, and where there are immediate and absolute consequences, I use fake names in real life. With Uni, I am enrolled under my real name and address. This is a requirement and it is verified, so there is nothing that I can realistically do about it. As for other services, I plan on setting up a personal mailbox (PMB), etc if possible to use as a real, physical address that is associated with my real name and that is used for things like Government issued ID. In the future when I move again, I plan on renting a place in cash to try and keep my name dissociated with my real address. For those looking for reasoning on why one would want to do that, please read How to be Invisible by J.J. Luna. It's truly the Bible of physical privacy.
At this stage I am just going off on a ramble, so I should cut it short here.
I have just started and I live for this shit.
submitted by ComprehensiveAddict to privacy [link] [comments]

Hoe do I start mining without a mining pool?

InB4 it isn't profitable.
How would I go about setting my PC (running linux) to mine the blockchain on its lonesome. I don't want to join a pool, I simply want to setup my hardware to mine the blockchain. Can someone tell me or direct me to the correct documentation. When I do a search all I get are: "Join a mining pool"
Thanks in advance.
submitted by rt79w to btc [link] [comments]

MVis Explainer: Stratum Protocol

I thought it would be good to post a series of articles explaining some features of my new mining pool, mvis.ca. First off is the Stratum Protocol. But to understand the stratum protocol we first need to understand what came before it, namely, the RPC protocol.

RPC Protocol

RPC stands for Remote Procedure Call. The mining software uses this protocol to continuously poll the mining pool via an HTTP request to see if any of the mining parameters have changed. It is somewhat analogous to kids in the back seat of your car on a long trip, continuously asking “Are we there yet? Are we there yet? Are we there yet?” Gets annoying real quick. Some miners configure their software to poll the mining pool multiple times per second. Obviously, with many miners, this is very inefficient and places a heavy load on the mining pool. In the very early days of cryptocurrency this was how all pools operated, but soon someone came up with something better, namely the Stratum protocol.

Stratum Protocol

The Stratum protocol, on the other hand, avoids continuously polling the pool by establishing a persistent TCP connection with the mining pool. (It’s like phoning someone and keeping the line open.) When the link is first opened the mining pool sends the current mining parameters to the miner. Whenever the mining parameters change, the mining pool simply sends the new values down to the miner on the open TCP link. Very fast. Very efficient. Nobody gets annoyed.
There's only one problem though - most of the software used to mine 0xBTC does not yet support the stratum protocol. The solution is to use a Stratum Proxy

Stratum Proxy

A Stratum Proxy is a program that acts as both a stratum client and an RPC server. You would typically run it alongside your mining software. As a stratum client, it connects up to the pool using the stratum protocol in order to obtain the current mining parameters. As an RPC server, it configures itself to listen on port 8080 in order to serve RPC requests from your mining software. Once you have the proxy running and configured, simply point your miner to http://localhost:8080. The mining software will think it's connected to a regular pool using the RPC protocol. You can read more about the proxy program here.
And that's about it. If you would like to mine at MVIS Mining Pool, please see the faq for detailed mining instructions. There's also a link to some detailed specs on the stratum protocol as implemented on my pool.
submitted by mining-visualizer to 0xbitcoin [link] [comments]

First home server; will my plan accomplish my goals?

I'm planning to build my first home server, and I'd love some feedback on my plans before I buy all the hardware. Can you folks help me with some feedback?
 
What I Want to Do with My Hardware
 
Constraints
 
Current Plan
 
Currently Planned Hardware
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Xeon E5-2660 V2 2.2 GHz 10-Core Processor $192.97 @ PCM
CPU Intel - Xeon E5-2660 V2 2.2 GHz 10-Core Processor $192.97 @ PCM
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler $89.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler $89.99 @ Amazon
Thermal Compound Thermal Grizzly - Aeronaut 3.9 g Thermal Paste $11.59 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - EP2C602-4L/D16 SSI EEB Dual-CPU LGA2011 Motherboard $481.98 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial - 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) Registered DDR3-1866 Memory $159.99 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital - Blue 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $114.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Western Digital - Blue 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $114.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Video Card Asus - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6 GB Strix Video Card $359.98 @ B&H
Case Phanteks - Enthoo Pro Tempered Glass ATX Full Tower Case $122.00 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - HX Platinum 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Newegg
Sound Card Creative Labs - Sound Blaster Z 30SB150200000 OEM 24-bit 192 kHz Sound Card $90.77 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $3002.00
Mail-in rebates -$40.00
Total $2962.00
 
Hardware Notes
 
Budget
 
Other Notes
 
My main question is: will this hardware and software setup accomplish my goals?
My secondary question is: is any of my hardware unnecessary for my goals? are there better ways to eat this Reese's?
Thanks so much for all the help in advance, I've learned so much from this subreddit (and DataHoarding) already!
submitted by therightrook to homelab [link] [comments]

MESSAGE TESTING! Looking for feedback, comments, and suggestions from the community

Hey everyone, the Komodo marketing team is finalizing some copy that will be used to send to people interested in building on Komodo. We'd like to message test this with the community before finalizing so please let us know if you have any suggestions or feedback. Thanks everyone!
END-TO-END BLOCKCHAIN SOLUTIONS
Komodo Platform is a thriving, open-source ecosystem of cutting-edge technologies in the burgeoning blockchain sphere. It is Komodo’s mission to accelerate the global adoption of blockchain technology by removing barriers to entry for developers, blockchain startups, and existing businesses alike with simple, end-to-end blockchain solutions.
When looking to integrate blockchain tech, there are many competing technologies and platforms to choose from. What sets Komodo Platform apart from the competition is a proven track record of identifying and innovating solutions to all of blockchain’s most pressing problems.
Rather than focusing on a single use case or feature, Komodo Platform has built a comprehensive toolkit of blockchain solutions that addresses every essential aspect of the technology. In particular, Komodo’s tech focuses on providing top-notch security, scalability, and interoperability, as well as hybrid privacy features.
This holistic approach ensures that all who build on Komodo have the tools they need to be successful, including a variety of customizable white-label products that slash time to market while still providing complete flexibility and control.
All of these strengths, combined with a clear vision for a global blockchain ecosystem, make Komodo Platform the world’s leading provider of end-to-end blockchain solutions.
AN ECOSYSTEM THAT ALWAYS PUTS SECURITY FIRST
For Komodo Platform, security comes first. Security is always at the forefront of the development process. As such, every blockchain launched on Komodo Platform is protected with the power of the Bitcoin hashrate.
At the same time, all blockchains built on Komodo are protected by Komodo’s innovative security mechanism, known as delayed Proof of Work (dPoW), which stores backups of the entire Komodo ecosystem onto the Bitcoin ledger every ten minutes.
Here’s how it works. Every ten minutes, a snapshot is taken of the entire Komodo ecosystem. Then, this snapshot is written into a block on the Bitcoin blockchain. This process is called notarization and it is the backbone of Komodo’s security mechanism. Komodo Platform’s notary nodes carry out the technical work required to successfully complete notarizations.
In essence, dPoW functions as a form of 2FA for blockchain projects. A potential attacker would need to take down both the BTC and KMD networks before they could alter, disrupt, or destroy your chain. Since the backup process takes place every ten minutes, your chain is constantly protected.
LIMITLESS SCALABILITY WHENEVER YOU NEED IT
Komodo provides every project built on the platform with virtually limitless scalability. A new feature from Komodo allows multiple blockchains to work in unison and behave as a single chain.
If one blockchain is no longer providing the performance you need, simply add another chain. If two isn’t sufficient, add a third. With Komodo Platform, you can scale on demand to keep up with the the needs of your business.
No other blockchain platform offers both this level of security and scalability. Some blockchain platforms can provide security, although you’re forced to share infrastructure with other projects. This increases congestion and transaction fees, thus limiting scalability.
Other blockchain platforms offer independent blockchains but leave you to your own devices when it comes to security. This is especially troublesome if you’re using a Proof of Work (PoW) consensus mechanism, since most projects generally do not have a high enough hashrate to protect themselves from 51% attacks. Without security, scalability is completely irrelevant.
THE INDEPENDENCE AND FLEXIBILITY YOU NEED
Blockchains created on Komodo are completely independent in the sense that what happens on one chain cannot and will not affect any other chain in the ecosystem. This is true because, unlike other platforms, chains launched on Komodo do not share infrastructure or networks.
As a result, there is no need to worry about congestion on Komodo Platform. There will never be an increase in the fees or length of time required to complete a transaction.
Moreover, projects built on Komodo may migrate away from the platform at any point in time. If, at any point in time, you feel that another platform is better-suited for the needs of your project, you are free to leave. Every blockchain launched on Komodo is the property of those who created it. There is no vendor lock-in on Komodo Platform.
Finally, every project effectively receives a clone copy of the KMD chain, so as Komodo continues to innovate new technologies, every chain in the ecosystem receives all of the additional enhancements and features. This lets you build on Komodo with peace of mind.
Future-proof your project by building on the world’s premier blockchain platform: Komodo.
CREATE A CUSTOMIZABLE BLOCKCHAIN WITH MAXIMUM FLEXIBILITY
  1. Customization — choose from optional modules to build a tailor-made solution
  2. Scalability — scale on demand to keep up with your project’s growth
  3. Independence — no shared infrastructure, blockchains, or networks
Komodo Assetchain Features
New Features In Testing & Development
ACCELERATE TIME TO MARKET WITH KOMODO’S WHITE-LABEL SOLUTIONS
Once you’ve created your very own secure, scalable, independent blockchain, Komodo offers several white-label apps to help you go to market faster. A multi-coin cryptocurrency app, an atomic-swap-powered decentralized exchange app, and a decentralized crowdfunding app are all included in Komodo’s Blockchain Starter Kit.
WHITE-LABEL MULTI-COIN WALLET
After your blockchain is operational, users will need somewhere to store that chain’s tokens. However, it can be difficult and expensive to have a new coin or token integrated into an existing crypto wallet. Developing a native crypto wallet is also a long and costly process.
That’s why Komodo provides every project with the option of a white-label multi-coin wallet app. Not only will users be able to store your chain’s tokens in it, they will also be able to store other popular cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Litecoin, ZCash, and KMD, Komodo’s native coin.
WHITE-LABEL DECENTRALIZED EXCHANGE
In addition, Komodo offers every project the choice of a white-label decentralized exchange app. Komodo’s decentralized exchange (DEX) will provide the backend tech necessary for the white-label app to function.
Komodo’s DEX is the world’s only truly decentralized exchange. While many exchanges claim to be decentralized, they still use proxy tokens, force users to give up their private keys at some point in the trading process, or give admin a backdoor option to freeze a user’s funds. By contrast, Komodo’s DEX is fully-powered by atomic swap technology.
Atomic swaps are peer-to-peer exchanges of cryptocurrency that allow users to retain control of their private keys throughout the entire trading process. As this method of trading occurs wallet-to-wallet, the need for centralized exchanges or other third parties is eliminated.
If a project built on Komodo uses the white-label decentralized exchange app, their blockchain’s tokens will be integrated into the DEX, providing instant access to liquidity. This is an enormous benefit, as many centralized exchanges charge exorbitant fees for listing a new coin or token.
WHITE-LABEL DECENTRALIZED CROWDFUND APP
The final white-label app included in Komodo’s Blockchain Starter Kit is a white-label crowdfunding application. This app is also powered by Komodo’s industry-leading atomic swap technology.
Crowdfunds launched on Komodo Platform are therefore more secure and much faster than a traditional, centralized ICO. Investors maintain possession of private keys throughout the crowdfund. Once the atomic swap is complete, they receive your chain’s tokens instantly.
Komodo’s Blockchain Starter Kit is designed to give you the products and technology you need to accelerate time to market and allow you to focus on ensuring that your project is a success.
INVESTMENT PROTECTION: A VISION FOR A GLOBAL BLOCKCHAIN ECOSYSTEM
The blockchain industry is currently developing at a breakneck pace. For this reason, it is absolutely essential to build on a platform that continues to evolve. At the rate the blockchain industry is currently moving, every platform must continue to evolve or face extinction.
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submitted by Daniel-C-Pigeon to komodoplatform [link] [comments]

Crypto and the Latency Arms Race: Crypto Exchanges and the HFT Crowd

Crypto and the Latency Arms Race: Crypto Exchanges and the HFT Crowd


News by Coindesk: Max Boonen
Carrying on from an earlier post about the evolution of high frequency trading (HFT), how it can harm markets and how crypto exchanges are responding, here we focus on the potential longer-term impact on the crypto ecosystem.
First, though, we need to focus on the state of HFT in a broader context.

Conventional markets are adopting anti-latency arbitrage mechanisms

In conventional markets, latency arbitrage has increased toxicity on lit venues and pushed trading volumes over-the-counter or into dark pools. In Europe, dark liquidity has increased in spite of efforts by regulators to clamp down on it. In some markets, regulation has actually contributed to this. Per the SEC:
“Using the Nasdaq market as a proxy, [Regulation] NMS did not seem to succeed in its mission to increase the display of limit orders in the marketplace. We have seen an increase in dark liquidity, smaller trade sizes, similar trading volumes, and a larger number of “small” venues.”
Why is non-lit execution remaining or becoming more successful in spite of its lower transparency? In its 2014 paper, BlackRock came out in favour of dark pools in the context of best execution requirements. It also lamented message congestion and cautioned against increasing tick sizes, features that advantage latency arbitrageurs. (This echoes the comment to CoinDesk of David Weisberger, CEO of Coinroutes, who explained that the tick sizes typical of the crypto market are small and therefore do not put slower traders at much of a disadvantage.)
Major venues now recognize that the speed race threatens their business model in some markets, as it pushes those “slow” market makers with risk-absorbing capacity to provide liquidity to the likes of BlackRock off-exchange. Eurex has responded by implementing anti-latency arbitrage (ALA) mechanisms in options:
“Right now, a lot of liquidity providers need to invest more into technology in order to protect themselves against other, very fast liquidity providers, than they can invest in their pricing for the end client. The end result of this is a certain imbalance, where we have a few very sophisticated liquidity providers that are very active in the order book and then a lot of liquidity providers that have the ability to provide prices to end clients, but are tending to do so more away from the order book”, commented Jonas Ullmann, Eurex’s head of market functionality. Such views are increasingly supported by academic research.
XTX identifies two categories of ALA mechanisms: policy-based and technology-based. Policy-based ALA refers to a venue simply deciding that latency arbitrageurs are not allowed to trade on it. Alternative venues to exchanges (going under various acronyms such as ECN, ATS or MTF) can allow traders to either take or make, but not engage in both activities. Others can purposefully select — and advertise — their mix of market participants, or allow users to trade in separate “rooms” where undesired firms are excluded. The rise of “alternative microstructures” is mostly evidenced in crypto by the surge in electronic OTC trading, where traders can receive better prices than on exchange.
Technology-based ALA encompasses delays, random or deterministic, added to an exchange’s matching engine to reduce the viability of latency arbitrage strategies. The classic example is a speed bump where new orders are delayed by a few milliseconds, but the cancellation of existing orders is not. This lets market makers place fresh quotes at the new prevailing market price without being run over by latency arbitrageurs.
As a practical example, the London Metal Exchange recently announced an eight-millisecond speed bump on some contracts that are prime candidates for latency arbitrageurs due to their similarity to products trading on the much bigger CME in Chicago.
Why 8 milliseconds? First, microwave transmission between Chicago and the US East Coast is 3 milliseconds faster than fibre optic lines. From there, the $250,000 a month Hibernia Express transatlantic cable helps you get to London another 4 milliseconds faster than cheaper alternatives. Add a millisecond for internal latencies such as not using FPGAs and 8 milliseconds is the difference for a liquidity provider between investing tens of millions in speed technology or being priced out of the market by latency arbitrage.
With this in mind, let’s consider what the future holds for crypto.

Crypto exchanges must not forget their retail roots

We learn from conventional markets that liquidity benefits from a diverse base of market makers with risk-absorption capacity.
Some have claimed that the spread compression witnessed in the bitcoin market since 2017 is due to electronification. Instead, I posit that it is greater risk-absorbing capacity and capital allocation that has improved the liquidity of the bitcoin market, not an increase in speed, as in fact being a fast exchange with colocation such as Gemini has not supported higher volumes. Old-timers will remember Coinsetter, a company that, per the Bitcoin Wiki , “was created in 2012, and operates a bitcoin exchange and ECN. Coinsetter’s CSX trading technology enables millisecond trade execution times and offers one of the fastest API data streams in the industry.” The Wiki page should use the past tense as Coinsetter failed to gain traction, was acquired in 2016 and subsequently closed.
Exchanges that invest in scalability and user experience will thrive (BitMEX comes to mind). Crypto exchanges that favour the fastest traders (by reducing jitter, etc.) will find that winner-takes-all latency strategies do not improve liquidity. Furthermore, they risk antagonising the majority of their users, who are naturally suspicious of platforms that sell preferential treatment.
It is baffling that the head of Russia for Huobi vaunted to CoinDesk that: “The option [of co-location] allows [selected clients] to make trades 70 to 100 times faster than other users”. The article notes that Huobi doesn’t charge — but of course, not everyone can sign up.
Contrast this with one of the most successful exchanges today: Binance. It actively discourages some HFT strategies by tracking metrics such as order-to-trade ratios and temporarily blocking users that breach certain limits. Market experts know that Binance remains extremely relevant to price discovery, irrespective of its focus on a less professional user base.
Other exchanges, take heed.
Coinbase closed its entire Chicago office where 30 engineers had worked on a faster matching engine, an exercise that is rumoured to have cost $50mm. After much internal debate, I bet that the company finally realised that it wouldn’t recoup its investment and that its value derived from having onboarded 20 million users, not from upgrading systems that are already fast and reliable by the standards of crypto.
It is also unsurprising that Kraken’s Steve Hunt, a veteran of low-latency torchbearer Jump Trading, commented to CoinDesk that: “We want all customers regardless of size or scale to have equal access to our marketplace”. Experience speaks.
In a recent article on CoinDesk , Matt Trudeau of ErisX points to the lower reliability of cloud-based services compared to dedicated, co-located and cross-connected gateways. That much is true. Web-based technology puts the emphasis on serving the greatest number of users concurrently, not on serving a subset of users deterministically and at the lowest latency possible. That is the point. Crypto might be the only asset class that is accessible directly to end users with a low number of intermediaries, precisely because of the crypto ethos and how the industry evolved. It is cheaper to buy $500 of bitcoin than it is to buy $500 of Microsoft shares.
Trudeau further remarks that official, paid-for co-location is better than what he pejoratively calls “unsanctioned colocation,” the fact that crypto traders can place their servers in the same cloud providers as the exchanges. The fairness argument is dubious: anyone with $50 can set up an Amazon AWS account and run next to the major crypto exchanges, whereas cheap co-location starts at $1,000 a month in the real world. No wonder “speed technology revenues” are estimated at $1 billion for the major U.S. equity exchanges.
For a crypto exchange, to reside in a financial, non-cloud data centre with state-of-the-art network latencies might ironically impair the likelihood of success. The risk is that such an exchange becomes dominated on the taker side by the handful of players that already own or pay for the fastest communication routes between major financial data centres such as Equinix and the CME in Chicago, where bitcoin futures are traded. This might reduce liquidity on the exchange because a significant proportion of the crypto market’s risk-absorption capacity is coming from crypto-centric funds that do not have the scale to operate low-latency strategies, but might make up the bulk of the liquidity on, say, Binance. Such mom-and-pop liquidity providers might therefore shun an exchange that caters to larger players as a priority.

Exchanges risk losing market share to OTC liquidity providers

While voice trading in crypto has run its course, a major contribution to the market’s increase in liquidity circa 2017–2018 was the risk appetite of the original OTC voice desks such as Cumberland Mining and Circle.
Automation really shines in bringing together risk-absorbing capacity tailored to each client (which is impossible on anonymous exchanges) with seamless electronic execution. In contrast, latency-sensitive venues can see liquidity evaporate in periods of stress, as happened to a well-known and otherwise successful exchange on 26 June which saw its bitcoin order book become $1,000 wide for an extended period of time as liquidity providers turned their systems off. The problem is compounded by the general unavailability of credit on cash exchanges, an issue that the OTC market’s settlement model avoids.
As the crypto market matures, the business model of today’s major cash exchanges will come under pressure. In the past decade, the FX market has shown that retail traders benefit from better liquidity when they trade through different channels than institutional speculators. Systematic internalizers demonstrate the same in equities. This fact of life will apply to crypto. Exchanges have to pick a side: either cater to retail (or retail-driven intermediaries) or court HFTs.
Now that an aggregator like Tagomi runs transaction cost analysis for their clients, it will become plainly obvious to investors with medium-term and long-term horizons (i.e. anyone not looking at the next 2 seconds) that their price impact on exchange is worse than against electronic OTC liquidity providers.
Today, exchange fee structures are awkward because they must charge small users a lot to make up for crypto’s exceptionally high compliance and onboarding costs. Onboarding a single, small value user simply does not make sense unless fees are quite elevated. Exchanges end up over-charging large volume traders such as B2C2’s clients, another incentive to switch to OTC execution.
In the alternative, what if crypto exchanges focus on HFT traders? In my opinion, the CME is a much better venue for institutional takers as fees are much lower and conventional trading firms will already be connected to it. My hypothesis is that most exchanges will not be able to compete with the CME for fast traders (after all, the CBOE itself gave up), and must cater to their retail user base instead.
In a future post, we will explore other microstructures beyond all-to-all exchanges and bilateral OTC trading.
Fiber threads image via Shutterstock
submitted by GTE_IO to u/GTE_IO [link] [comments]

Need help trying to figure out why block contains few transactions

I'm trying to troubleshoot bitcoin block 0000000000000000001aaef7bdca12abf93c862b5df4db96ca6130b6445655c1. The Prohashing pool found this block this morning, but it only has 9 transactions. The blocks around it appear to have many more transactions than this one does, some as many as 1300. Yet, getblocktemplate returned just a few transactions. This is the third block where there were about the same number of transactions.
Since all the other coins mined by the pool contain a lot of transactions, it's unlikely that this problem is a bug in the mining server that limits blocks to 9 transactions. For example, litecoin block 9d24ac1c74689309c08f4d2bd4eb47210c8f44f4c788472fd003bf7d8d4ad562 contains 19 transactions. Bitcoin Cash block 000000000000000000c966e7c0f566df540efc2b30604188a7cf511cb8e41730 also contains more than 9 transactions. That's why I think the problem is a configuration error.
Here's the bitcoin.conf file, in case that helps.
server=1 daemon=1 port=4516 rpcuser=daemon rpcpassword=[censored] rpcport=3210 rpctimeout=30 blocknotify=/usshare/blocknotify_new.sh --user=daemon --pass=[censored] #maxconnections=8 txconfirmtarget=6 minrelaytxfee=0.00005 addnode=v4.us-east.fibre.bitcoinrelaynetwork.org 
and here's what getinfo() returns:
{ "version": 1000300, "protocolversion": 80002, "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 15.98119571, "blocks": 534848, "timeoffset": 0, "connections": 27, "proxy": "", "difficulty": 5949437371609.53, "testnet": false, "keypoololdest": 1529134290, "keypoolsize": 100, "unlocked_until": 0, "paytxfee": 0.00000000, "relayfee": 0.00002423, "errors": "Warning: unknown new rules activated (versionbit 1)" } 
While a lot of discussion here is about BCH, all of our employees are banned from all of the Core's discussion forums, so this is the only place we can go. Any help someone can provide would be appreciated, as including more transactions in blocks would also allow the networks to function better for everyone.
submitted by MattAbrams to btc [link] [comments]

if you think the 21inc bitcoin computer is a waste of money because of ROI, i believe you're missing the point

i keep seeing posts about people being upset because they can't understand why someone would pay $400 for a raspberry pi with a mining shield, a big ass heatsink, and a fan. this isn't marketed as a bitcoin mining device. it's being marketed as a device (a dev kit for future devices, at this point) that is designed to integrate with bitcoin in many ways. mining is one (and definitely not the only one) of the ways it does that. and it's not mining to just be mining.
i'm not super familiar with the ins and outs of this newfangled device, but it seems to me like the satoshis are for other uses, like smart contract kinds of uses. the things are definitely not mining for profit.
i don't get everyone's obsession with ROI. would you be considering the ROI if you were investing in any other computer? obviously a computer is an investment, but the value you get out of it is from its utility. you can do all kinds of crazy cool shit with a computer. things you never imagined you could do before. i recently got a raspberry pi, and the uses seem endless. i never thought i would be learning about linux, coding, web design, electronics, robotics, music, web servers, home servers, proxys, radio, graphic design, and home automation, all because of the same little device! i don't see anything keeping this 21inc device from being a great tool for bitcoin innovation on many levels. and it seems they're just getting started.
it also seems to me like 21inc will eventually have a very decentralized mining pool. plus, the existence of another mining pool adds decentralization to bitcoin mining in general. right?
perhaps someone who is more knowledgeable could elaborate or cmv?
tl;dr the 21 inc computer is not a mining rig. it's a computer. it does stuff. some people find value in that.
submitted by ringlocksmith to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Blowing the lid off the CryptoNote/Bytecoin scam (with the exception of Monero) - Reformatted for Reddit

Original post by rethink-your-strategy on Bitcointalk.org here
This post has been reformatted to share on Reddit. What once was common knowledge, is now gone. You want a quality history lesson? Share this like wildfire.
August 15, 2014, 08:15:37 AM

Preamble

I'd like to start off by stating categorically that the cryptography presented by CryptoNote is completely, entirely solid. It has been vetted and looked over by fucking clever cryptographers/developers/wizards such as gmaxwell. Monero have had a group of independent mathematicians and cryptographers peer-reviewing the whitepaper (their annotations are here, and one of their reviews is here), and this same group of mathematicians and cryptographers is now reviewing the implementation of the cryptography in the Monero codebase. Many well known Bitcoin developers have already had a cursory look through the code to establish its validity. It is safe to say that, barring more exotic attacks that have to be mitigated over time as they are invented/discovered, and barring a CryptoNote implementation making rash decisions to implement something that reduces the anonymity set, the CryptoNote currencies are all cryptographically unlinkable and untraceable.
Two other things I should mention. I curse a lot when I'm angry (and scams like this make me angry). Second, where used my short date format is day/month/year (smallest to biggest).
If you find this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.

The Alleged CryptoNote/Bytecoin Story

CryptoNote is a new cryptocurrency protocol. It builds on some of the Bitcoin founding principles, but it adds to them. There are aspects of it that are truly well thought through and, in a sense, quite revolutionary. CryptoNote claim to have started working on their project years ago after Bitcoin's release, and I do not doubt the validity of this claim...clearly there's a lot of work and effort that went into this. The story as Bytecoin and CryptoNote claim it to be is as follows:
They developed the code for the principles expressed in their whitepaper, and in April, 2012, they released Bytecoin. All of the copyright messages in Bytecoin's code are "copyright the CryptoNote Developers", so clearly they are one and the same as the Bytecoin developers. In December 2012, they released their CryptoNote v1 whitepaper. In September 2013, they released their CryptoNote v2 whitepaper. In November 2013, the first piece of the Bytecoin code was first pushed to Github by "amjuarez", with a "Copyright (c) 2013 amjuarez" copyright notice. This was changed to "Copyright (c) 2013 Antonio Juarez" on March 3rd, 2014. By this juncture only the crypto libraries had been pushed up to github. Then, on March 4th, 2014, "amjuarez" pushed the rest of the code up to github, with the README strangely referring to "cybernote", even though the code referred to "Cryptonote". The copyrights all pointed to "the Cryptonote developers", and the "Antonio Juarez" copyright and license file was removed. Within a few days, "DStrange" stumbled across the bytecoin.org website when trying to mine on the bte.minefor.co.in pool (a pool for the-other-Bytecoin, BTE, not the-new-Bytecoin, BCN), and the rest is history as we know it. By this time Bytecoin had had a little over 80% of its total emission mined.

Immediate Red Flags

The first thing that is a red flag in all of this is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, is a known entity. "Antonio Juarez" is not a known entity, "DStrange" is not a known entity, none of the made up names on the Bytecoin website exist (they've since removed their "team" page, see below), none of the made up names on the CryptoNote website exist (Johannes Meier, Maurice Planck, Max Jameson, Brandon Hawking, Catherine Erwin, Albert Werner, Marec Plíškov). If they're pseudonyms, then say so. If they're real names, then who the fuck are they??? Cryptographers, mathematicians, and computer scientists are well known - they have published papers or at least have commented on articles of interest. Many of them have their own github repos and Twitter feeds, and are a presence in the cryptocurrency community.
The other immediate red flag is that nobody, and I mean no-fucking-body, had heard of Bytecoin. Those that had heard of it thought it was the crummy SHA-256 Bitcoin clone that was a flop in the market. Bytecoin's claim that it had existed "on the deep web" for 2 years was not well received, because not a single vendor, user, miner, drug addict, drug seller, porn broker, fake ID card manufacturer, student who bought a fake ID card to get into bars, libertarian, libertard, cryptographer, Tor developer, Freenet developer, i2p developer, pedophile, or anyone else that is a known person - even just known on the Internet - had ever encountered "Bytecoin" on Tor. Ever. Nobody.

Indisputable Facts

Before I start with some conjecture and educated guesswork, I'd like to focus on an indisputable fact that obliterates any trust in both Bytecoin's and CryptoNote's bullshit story. Note, again, that I do not doubt the efficacy of the mathematics and cryptography behind CryptoNote, nor do I think there are backdoors in the code. What I do know for a fact is that the people behind CryptoNote and Bytecoin have actively deceived the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency community, and that makes them untrustworthy now and in the future. If you believe in the fundamentals in CryptoNote, then you need simply use a CryptoNote-derived cryptocurrency that is demonstrably independent of CryptoNote and Bytecoin's influence. Don't worry, I go into this a little later.
So as discussed, there were these two whitepapers that I linked to earlier. Just in case they try remove them, here is the v1 whitepaper and the v2 whitepaper mirrored on Archive.org. This v1/v2 whitepaper thing has been discussed at length on the Bytecoin forum thread, and the PGP signature on the files has been confirmed as being valid. When you open the respective PDFs you'll notice the valid signatures in them:
signature in the v1 whitepaper
signature in the v2 whitepaper
These are valid Adobe signatures, signed on 15/12/2012 and 17/10/2013 respectively. Here's where it gets interesting. When we inspect this file in Adobe Acrobat we get a little more information on the signature
.
Notice the bit that says "Signing time is from the clock on the signer's computer"? Now normally you would use a Timestamp Authority (TSA) to validate your system time. There are enough public, free, RFC 3161 compatible TSAs that this is not a difficult thing. CryptoNote chose not do this. But we have no reason to doubt the time on the signature, right guys? crickets
.
See these references from the v1 whitepaper footnotes? Those two also appear in the v2 whitepaperth. Neither of those two footnotes refer to anything in the main body of the v1 whitepaper's text, they're non-existent (in the v2 whitepaper they are used in text). The problem, though, is that the Bitcointalk post linked in the footnote is not from early 2012 (proof screenshot is authentic: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=196259.0)
.
May 5, 2013. The footnote is referencing a post that did not exist until then. And yet we are to believe that the whitepaper was signed on 12/12/2012! What sort of fucking fools do they take us for?
A little bit of extra digging validates this further. The document properties for both the v1 whitepaper as well as the v2 whitepaper confirms they were made in TeX Live 2013, which did not exist on 12/12/2012. The XMP properties are also quite revealing
XMP properties for the v1 whitepaper
XMP properties for the v2 whitepaper
According to that, the v1 whitepaper PDF was created on 10/04/2014, and the v2 whitepaper was created on 13/03/2014. And yet both of these documents were then modified in the past (when they were signed). Clearly the CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are so advanced they also have a time machine, right?
Final confirmation that these creation dates are correct are revealed those XMP properties. The properties on both documents confirm that the PDF itself was generated from the LaTeX source using pdfTeX-1.40.14 (the pdf:Producer property). Now pdfTeX is a very old piece of software that isn't updated very often, so the minor version (the .14 part) is important.
.
pdfTeX 1.40.14 pushed to source repo on Feb 14, 2014
.
This version of pdfTeX was only pushed to the pdfTeX source repository on February 14, 2014, although it was included in a very early version of TeX Live 2013 (version 2013.20130523-1) that was released on May 23, 2013. The earliest mentions on the Internet of this version of pdfTeX are in two Stack Exchange comments that confirm its general availability at the end of May 2013 (here and here).
The conclusion we draw from this is that the CryptoNote developers, as clever as they were, intentionally deceived everyone into believing that the CryptoNote whitepapers were signed in 2012 and 2013, when the reality is that the v2 whitepaper was created in March, 2014, and the v1 whitepaper haphazardly created a month later by stripping bits out of the v2 whitepaper (accidentally leaving dead footnotes in).
Why would they create this fake v2 whitepaper in the first place? Why not just create a v1 whitepaper, or not even version it at all? The answer is simple: they wanted to lend credence and validity to the Bytecoin "2 years on the darkweb" claim so that everyone involved in CryptoNote and Bytecoin could profit from the 2 year fake mine of 82% of Bytecoin. What they didn't expect is the market to say "no thank you" to their premine scam.

And Now for Some Conjecture

As I mentioned earlier, the Bytecoin "team" page disappeared. I know it exists, because "AtomicDoge" referred to it as saying that one of the Bytecoin developers is a professor at Princeton. I called them out on it, and within a week the page had disappeared. Fucking cowards.
That was the event that triggered my desire to dig deeper and uncover the fuckery. As I discovered more and more oddities, fake accounts, trolling, and outright falsehoods, I wondered how deep the rabbit hole went. My starting point was DStrange. This is the account on Bitcointalk that "discovered" Bytecoin accidentally a mere 6 days after the first working iteration of the code was pushed to Github, purely by chance when mining a nearly dead currency on a tiny and virtually unheard of mining pool. He has subsequently appointed himself the representative of Bytecoin, or something similar. The whole thing is so badly scripted it's worse than a Spanish soap opera...I can't tell who Mr. Gonzales, the chief surgeon, is going to fuck next.
At the same time as DStrange made his "fuck me accidental discovery", another Bitcointalk account flared up to also "accidentally discover this weird thing that has randomly been discovered": Rias. What's interesting about both the "Rias" and "DStrange" accounts are their late 2013 creation date (October 31, 2013, and December 23, 2013, respectively), and yet they lay dormant until suddenly, out of the blue, on January 20th/21st they started posting. If you look at their early posts side by side you can even see the clustering: Rias, DStrange.
At any rate, the DStrange account "discovering" Bytecoin is beyond hilarious, especially with the Rias account chiming in to make the discovery seem natural. Knowing what we unmistakably do about the fake CryptoNote PDF dates lets us see this in a whole new light.
Of course, as has been pointed out before, the Bytecoin website did not exist in its "discovered" form until sometime between November 13, 2013 (when it was last captured as this random picture of a college girl) and February 25, 2014 (when it suddenly had the website on it as "discovered"). This can be confirmed by looking at the captures on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://bytecoin.org
The CryptoNote website, too, did not exist in its current form until after October 20, 2013, at which time it was still the home of an encrypted message project by Alain Meier, a founding member of the Stanford Bitcoin Group and co-founder of BlockScore. This, too, can be confirmed on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/*/http://cryptonote.org
~It's hard to ascertain whether Alain had anything to do with CryptoNote or Bytecoin. It's certainly conceivable that the whitepaper was put together by him and other members of the Stanford Bitcoin Group, and the timeline fits, given that the group only formed around March 2013. More info on the people in the group can be found on their site, and determining if they played a role is something you can do in your own time.~
Update: Alain Meier posted in this thread, and followed it up with a Tweet, confirming that he has nothing to do with CryptoNote and all the related...stuff.

Batshit Insane

The Bytecoin guys revel in creating and using sockpuppet accounts. Remember that conversation where "Rias" asked who would put v1 on a whitepaper with no v2 out, and AlexGR said "a forward looking individual"? The conversation took place on May 30, and was repeated verbatim by shill accounts on Reddit on August 4 (also, screenshot in case they take it down).
Those two obvious sockpuppet/shill accounts also take delight in bashing Monero in the Monero sub-reddit (here are snippets from WhiteDynomite and cheri0). Literally the only thing these sockpuppets do, day in and day out, is make the Bytecoin sub-reddit look like it's trafficked, and spew angry bullshit all over the Monero sub-reddit. Fucking batshit insane - who the fuck has time for that? Clearly they're pissy that nobody has fallen for their scam. Oh, and did I mention that all of these sockpuppets have a late January/early February creation date? Because that's not fucking obvious at all.
And let's not forget that most recently the sockpuppets claimed that multi-sig is "a new revolutionary technology, it was discovered a short time ago and Bytecoin already implemented it". What the actual fuck. If you think that's bad, you're missing out on the best part of all: the Bytecoin shills claim that Bytecoin is actually Satoshi Nakamoto's work. I'm not fucking kidding you. For your viewing pleasure...I present to you...the Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus:
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https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=512747.msg8354977#msg8354977
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Seriously. Not only is this insulting as fuck to Satoshi Nakamoto, but it's insulting as fuck to our intelligence. And yet the fun doesn't stop there, folks! I present to you...the centerpiece of this Bytecoin Batshit Insane Circus exhibit...
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Of course! How could we have missed it! The clues were there all along! The CryptoNote/Bytecoin developers are actually aliens! Fuck me on a pogostick, this is the sort of stuff that results in people getting committed to the loony bin.
One last thing: without doing too much language analysis (which is mostly supposition and bullshit), it's easy to see common grammar and spelling fuck ups. My personal favorite is the "Is it true?" question. You can see it in the Bytecoin thread asking if it's Satoshi's second project, in the Monero thread asking if the Monero devs use a botnet to fake demand, and in the Dashcoin thread confirming the donation address (for a coin whose only claim is that they copy Bytecoin perfectly, what the fuck do they need donations for??).

Layer After Layer

One of the things that happened soon after the Bytecoin "big reveal" was a string of forks popping up. The first was Bitmonero on April 18. Fantomcoin was launched May 6. Quazarcoin was launched May 8. HoneyPenny was announced on April 21, although only launched as Boolberry on May 17. duckNote was launched on May 30. MonetaVerde as launched June 17.
Now for some reason unbeknownst to anyone with who isn't a retarded fuckface, the Bytecoin code was pushed up to SourceForge on 08/04/2014 (the "Registered" date is at the bottom of the page). I have no idea why they did this, maybe it's to try and lend credence to their bullshit story (oh hey, look how old Bytecoin is, it's even on Sourceforge!)
Coincidentally, and completely unrelated (hurr durr), Quazarcoin, Fantomcoin, and Monetaverde are all also on Sourceforge. This gives us a frame of reference and a common link between them - it's quite clear that at least these three are run by the same team as CryptoNote. There is further anecdotal evidence that can be gathered by looking at the shill posts in the threads (especially the way the Moneteverda shills praise merge mining, in a way that is nearly fucking indistinguishable from the Bytecoin praise for multi-sig technology).
QuazarCoin is a special case and deserves a little attention. Let's start with OracionSeis, who launched it. He's well known on Bitcointalk for selling in-game currencies. In that same thread you'll notice this gem right at the end from Fullbuster: "Hey,OracionSeis is no longer under my use so please https://bitcointa.lk/threads/selling-most-of-the-game-currencies.301540/#post-5996983 come into this thread! thank you !" Click through to his new link and Fullbuster clarifies: "Hello, I may look new around here but i've sold my first account and created new one and i have an intention to keep the same services running as my first account did." So now that we know that OracionSeis is a fucking bought account, we can look at his actions a little more critically.
On May 7, just when Monero was being taken back by the community (see below), OracionSeis out of the blue decided to take it overelaunch it himself. This included a now-defunct website at monero.co.in, and a since-abandoned Github. The community pushed back hard, true to form, with hard-hitting statements such as "To reiterate, this is not the original devs, and thus not a relaunch. OP, fuck you for trying this. This should warrant a ban." A man after my own heart. OracionSeis caved and decided to rename it to...QuazarCoin, which launched on May 8. To recap: bought account, launched by trying to "relaunch" Monero, got fucked up, renamed it to QuazarCoin. Clearly and undeniably goes in our pile of fuckface coins.
The other three are a little more interesting. Let's start with ~fuckNote~duckNote. It's hard to say if duckNote is a CryptoNote/Bytecoin project. The addition of the HTML based wallet is a one-trick pony, a common thread among most of the CryptoNote/Bytecoin controlled coins, but that could also be the result of a not-entirely-retarded developer. Given the shill posts in the duckNote thread I'm going to flag it as possibly-controlled-by-the-fuckface-brigade.
And now we come to ~HoneyPenny~ ~MoneyPenny~ ~HoneyBerry~ ~Boolean~ Boolberry. This is an interesting one. This was "pre-announced" on April 21, although it was only released with the genesis block on May 17. This puts it fourth in line, after Fantomcoin and Quazarcoin, although fucktarded proponents of the shittily-named currency insist that it was launched on April 21 because of a pre-announcement. Fucking rejects from the Pool of Stupidity, some of them. At any rate, "cryptozoidberg" is the prolific coder that churned out a Keccak-derived PoW (Wild Keccak) in a month, and then proceeded to add completely fucking retarded features like address aliasing that requires you to mine a block to get an address (lulz) and will never cause any issues when "google" or "obama" or "zuckerberg" want their alias back. Namecoin gets around this by forcing you to renew every ~200 - 250 days, and besides, nobody is making payments to microsoft.bit. This aliasing system is another atypical one-trick-pony that the CryptoNote developers push out and claim is monumental and historical and amazing.
There's also the matter of cryptozoidberg's nickname. In the Bytecoin code there's the BYTECOIN_NETWORK identifiert, which according to the comment is "Bender's nightmare" (hurr durr, such funny, 11100111110001011011001210110110 has a 2 in it). Now this may be a little bit of conjecture, yo, but the same comment appears twice in the "epee" contributed library, once in the levin signature, and again in the portable storage signature. The contexts are so disconnected and different that it would be a fucking stretch to imagine that the same person did not write both of these. We can also rule out this being a Bytecoin-specific change, as the "Bender's nightmare" comments exist in the original epee library on githubw (which is completely unused anywhere on the planet except in Bytecoin, most unusual for a library that has any usefulness, and was first committed to github on February 9, 2014).
We know from the copyright that Andrey N. Sabelnikov is the epee author, and we can say with reasonable certainty that he was involved in Bytecoin's creation and is the dev behind Boolberry. Sabelnikov is quite famous - he wrote the Kelihos botnet code and worked at two Russian security firms, Microsoft took him to court for his involvement (accusing him of operating the botnet as well), and then settled with him out of court on the basis of him not running the botnet but just having written the code. Kelihos is a botnet that pumped out online pharmacy spam (you know the fucking annoying "Y-ou Ne3D Vi-4Gra!?" emails? those.) so it's good to see he transitioned from that to a cryptocurrency scam. Regardless of BBR's claim to have "fixed" CryptoNote's privacy (and the fake fight on Bitcointalk between the "Bytecoin devs" and cryptozoidberg), it's clear that the link between them is not transparent. BBR is either the brainchild of a spam botnet author that worked on Bytecoin, or it's the CryptoNote developers trying to have one currency distanced from the rest so that they have a claim for legitimacy. I think it's the second one, and don't want to enter into a fucking debate about it. Make up your own mind.
Which brings us to the oddest story of the bunch: Bitmonero. It's pretty clear, given its early launch date and how unfamiliar anyone was with creating a genesis block or working in completely undocumented code, that thankful_for_today is/was part of the CryptoNote developers. He made a fatal error, though: he thought (just like all the other cryptocurrencies) that being "the dev" made him infallible. Ya know what happened? He tried to force his ideas, the community politely said "fuck you", and Bitmonero was forked into Monero, which is leading the pack of CryptoNote-based coins today. Let me be perfectly fucking clear: it doesn't matter that the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers know their code and can push stuff out, and it doesn't matter that Sabelnikov can shovel bullshit features into his poorly named cryptocurrency, and it doesn't matter that Monetaverde is "green" and has "merged mining". Nobody working behind these cryptocurrencies is known in the cryptocurrency community, and that alone should be a big fucking red flag. Monero is streets ahead, partly because of the way they're developing the currency, but mostly because the "core devs" or whatever they're called are made up of reasonably well-known people. That there are a bunch of them (6 or 7?) plus a bunch of other people contributing code means that they're sanity checking each other.
And, as we saw, this has fucking infuriated the Bytecoin/CryptoNote developers. They're so angry they waste hours and hours with their Reddit accounts trawling the Monero sub-reddit, for what? Nobody has fallen for their scam, and after my revelation today nobody fucking will. Transparency wins, everything else is bullshit.
As pointed out by canonsburg, when the Bytecoin/CryptoNote people realised they'd lost the fucking game, they took a "scorched earth" approach. If they couldn't have the leading CryptoNote coin...they'd fucking destroy the rest by creating a shit-storm of CryptoNote coins. Not only did they setup a thread with "A complete forking guide to create your own CryptoNote currency", but they even have a dedicated website with a fuckton of JavaScript. Unfortunately this plan hasn't worked for them, because they forgot that nobody gives a fuck, and everyone is going to carry on forking Bitcoin-based coins because of the massive infrastructure and code etc. that works with Bitcoin-based coins.
There are a bunch of other useless CryptoNote coins, by the way: Aeon, Dashcoin, Infinium-8, OneEvilCoin. We saw earlier that Dashcoin is probably another CryptoNote developer driven coin. However, this entire group is not really important enough, nor do they have enough potential, for me to give a single fuck, so make up your own mind. New CryptoNote coins that pop up should be regarded with the utmost caution, given the bullshit capabilities that we've already seen.

All Tied Up in a Bow

I want to cement the relationship between the major CryptoNote shitcoins. I know that my previous section had a lot of conjecture in it, and there's been some insinuation that I'm throwing everyone under the bus because I'm raging against the machine. That's not my style. I'm more of a Katy Perry fan..."you're going to hear me roar". There were some extra links I uncovered during my research, and I lacked the time to add it to this post. Thankfully a little bit of sleep and a can of Monster later have given me the a chance to add this. Let's start with an analysis of the DNS records of the CN coins.
If we look at the whois and DNS records for bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com, we find three common traits, from not-entirely-damming to oh-shiiiiiiit:
  1. There's a lot of commonality with the registrar (NameCheap for almost all of them), the DNS service (HurricaneElectric's Free DNS or NameCheap's DNS), and with the webhost (LibertyVPS, QHosteSecureFastServer.com, etc.)
  2. All of the CN domains use WhoisGuard or similar private registration services.
  3. Every single domain, without exception, uses Zoho for email. The only outlier is bitmonero.org that uses Namecheap's free email forwarding, but it's safe to disregard this as the emails probably just forward to the CryptoNote developers' email.
The instinct may be to disregard this as a fucking convenient coincidence. But it isn't: Zoho used to be a distant second go Google Apps, but has since fallen hopelessly behind. Everyone uses Google Apps or they just use mail forwarding or whatever. With the rest of the points as well, as far-fetched as the link may seem, it's the combination that is unusual and a dead giveaway of the common thread. Just to demonstrate that I'm not "blowing shit out of proportion" I went and checked the records for a handful of coins launched over the past few months to see what they use.
darkcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: Amazon AWS, open registration through NameCheap monero.cc: mail: mail.monero.cc, hosting: behind CloudFlare, open registration through Gandi xc-official.com: mail: Google Apps, hosting: MODX Cloud, hidden registration (DomainsByProxy) through GoDaddy blackcoin.io: mail: Namecheap email forwarding, hosting: behind BlackLotus, open registration through NameCheap bitcoindark.org: mail: no MX records, hosting: Google User Content, open registration through Wix viacoin.org: mail: mx.viacoin.org, hosting: behind CloudFlare, closed registration (ContactPrivacy) through Hostnuke.com neutrinocoin.org: mail: HostGator, hosting: HostGator, open registration through HostGator
There's no common thread between them. Everyone uses different service providers and different platforms. And none of them use Zoho.
My next check was to inspect the web page source code for these sites to find a further link. If you take a look at the main CSS file linked in the source code for monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, bitmonero.org, and bytecoiner.org, we find a CSS reset snippet at the top. It has a comment at the top that says "/* CSS Reset /", and then where it resets/sets the height it has the comment "/ always display scrollbars */". Now, near as I can find, this is a CSS snipped first published by Jake Rocheleau in an article on WebDesignLedger on October 24, 2012 (although confusingly Google seems to think it appeared on plumi.de cnippetz first, but checking archive.org shows that it was only added to that site at the beginning of 2013). It isn't a very popular CSS reset snippet, it got dumped in a couple of gists on Github, and translated and re-published in an article on a Russian website in November, 2012 (let's not go full-blown conspiritard and assume this links "cryptozoidberg" back to this, he's culpable enough on his own).
It's unusual to the point of being fucking impossible for one site to be using this, let alone a whole string of supposedly unrelated sites. Over the past few years the most popular CSS reset scripts have been Eric Meyer's "Reset CSS", HTML5 Doctor CSS Reset, Yahoo! (YUI 3) Reset CSS, Universal Selector ‘’ Reset, and Normalize.css, none of which contain the "/ CSS Reset /" or "/ always display scrollbars */" comments.
You've got to ask yourself a simple question: at what point does the combination of all of these fucking coincidental, completely unusual elements stop being coincidence and start becoming evidence of a real, tenable link? Is it possible that bytecoin.org, quazarcoin.org, fantomcoin.org, monetaverde.org, cryptonote.org, bytecoiner.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonotestarter.org, and boolberry.com just happen to use similar registrars/DNS providers/web hosts and exactly the fucking same wildly unpopular email provider? And is it also possible that monetaverde.org, fantomcoin.org, quazarcoin.org, cryptonotefoundation.org, cryptonote-coin.org, cryptonote.org, and bytecoin.org just happen to use the same completely unknown, incredibly obscure CSS reset snippet? It's not a conspiracy, it's not a coincidence, it's just another piece of evidence that all of these were spewed out by the same fucking people.

The Conclusion of the Matter

Don't take the last section as any sort of push for Monero. I think it's got potential (certainly much more than the other retarded "anonymous" coins that "developers" are popping out like street children from a cheap ho), and I hold a bit of XMR for shits and giggles, so take that tacit endorsement with a pinch of fucking salt.
The point is this: Bytecoin's 82% premine was definitely the result of a faked blockchain. CryptoNote's whitepaper dates were purposely falsified to back up this bullshit claim. Both Bytecoin and CryptoNote have perpetuated this scam by making up fake website data and all sorts. They further perpetuate it using shill accounts, most notably "DStrange" and "Rias" among others.
They launched a series of cryptocurrencies that should be avoided at all cost: Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, and Monetaverde. They are likely behind duckNote and Boolberry, but fuck it, it's on your head if you want to deal with scam artists and botnet creators.
They developed amazing technology, and had a pretty decent implementation. They fucked themselves over by being fucking greedy, being utterly retarded, being batshit insane, and trying to create legitimacy where there was none. They lost the minute the community took Monero away from them, and no amount of damage control will save them from their own stupidity.
I expect there to be a fuck-ton of shills posting in this thread (and possibly a few genuine supporters who don't know any better). If you want to discuss or clarify something, cool, let's do that. If you want to have a protracted debate about my conjecture, then fuck off, it's called conjecture for a reason you ignoramus. I don't really give a flying fuck if I got it right or wrong, you're old and ugly enough to make up your own mind.
tl;dr - CryptoNote developers faked dates in whitepapers. Bytecoin faked dates in fake blockchain to facilitate an 82% premine, and CryptoNote backed them up. Bytecoin, Fantomcoin, Quazarcoin, Monetaverde, Dashcoin are all from the same people and should be avoided like the fucking black plague. duckNote and Boolberry are probably from them as well, or are at least just fucking dodgy, and who the fuck cares anyway. Monero would have been fucking dodgy, but the community saved it. Make your own mind up about shit and demand that known people are involved and that there is fucking transparency. End transmission.
Just a reminder that if you found this information useful, a little donation would go a long way. Bitcoin address is 1rysLufu4qdVBRDyrf8ZjXy1nM19smTWd.
submitted by OsrsNeedsF2P to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

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